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U.S. military flights to Central African Republic set to start Thursday

By Barbara Starr, CNN Pentagon Correspondent
updated 5:54 PM EST, Wed December 11, 2013
A Central African Republic police officer chases looters attacking a broken-down truck Friday, February 7, in the capital of Bangui. The country, a former French colony, was plunged into chaos last year after a coalition of mostly Muslim rebels ousted President Francois Bozize. A Central African Republic police officer chases looters attacking a broken-down truck Friday, February 7, in the capital of Bangui. The country, a former French colony, was plunged into chaos last year after a coalition of mostly Muslim rebels ousted President Francois Bozize.
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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • U.S. military airlifts of Burundi forces expected to begin Thursday
  • The dropoffs in Bangui, the capital, expected to be short due to violence
  • U.S. President Barack Obama calls for the country to reject violence
  • The Central African Republic is wracked by internal conflict

(CNN) -- The U.S. military expects on Thursday to begin flying Burundi forces into the Central African Republic to help stop the violence in that war-torn country, according to a U.S. military official.

The United States has two C-17 aircraft in Uganda that will pick up the forces in Burundi and unload them in Bangui, the capital. The official emphasized the U.S. planes will remain on the ground in Bangui for a very short period due to the violence there.

The official also said the United States believes its planes and crews will be safe, because French forces control the airport there. The airlift of Burundi forces is expected to last about a week. Discussions about what additional assistance the United State may provide continue.

The Pentagon announced Monday that American military would fly African and European peacekeepers to the Central African Republic, which is in the midst of a bloody internal conflict between various proclaimed Christian and Muslim militias and other rebel factions.

That announcement was followed by a statement from President Barack Obama, who called on the country's citizens to reject violence and urged the transitional government to join "respected leaders" in Muslim and Christian communities in calling for "calm and peace."

"Individuals who are engaging in violence must be held accountable in accordance with the law. Meanwhile, as forces from other African countries and France work to restore security, the United States will support their efforts to protect civilians," Obama said.

Pentagon spokesman Carl Woog said "the United States is joining the international community" in aiding the peackeeping effort "because of our belief that immediate action is required to avert a humanitarian and human rights catastrophe."

Violence in Central African Republic
French troops begin operation in Africa

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel responded after talking with his French counterpart, Yves Le Drian, on Sunday from Afghanistan, Woog said, adding that France asked for "limited assistance."

The request for near term help involves U.S. air support to enable the prompt deployment of African forces "to prevent the further spread of sectarian violence," Woog said.

Violence has raged in the former French colony east of Cameroon since a coalition of rebels deposed President Francois Bozize in March. It was the latest in a series of coups since the nation gained independence. Bozize fled the country after his ouster.

Left uncontrolled, militia groups are uniting along religious lines. Christian vigilante groups have formed to battle Seleka, the predominantly Muslim coalition behind the President's removal.

More than 400,000 people -- nearly 10% of the population -- have been internally displaced, according to the United Nations.

Those displaced include people hiding in the bush without shelter, food, or drinking water, Doctors Without Borders has said.

In a statement on Monday, the international medical organization called for all parties to let the wounded and sick "safely obtain medical care," and for "an end to violence and threats against patients, civilians, and medical staff" nationwide.

The U.N. Security Council unanimously approved a resolution last week authorizing military intervention by an African Union-led force backed by French troops to protect civilians, restore humanitarian access and stabilize the country.

As part of the effort, the United States will fly troops from Burundi to the Central African Republic capital of Bangui.

The Pentagon will provide security for its planes, but there is no indication about the number of troops involved. The operation is expected to be relatively small.

Violence on the ground, which has included machetes, knives, rifles and grenades, will be a "big factor" in any U.S. operation, a U.S. official told CNN.

"It's a concern," the official said.

French President Francois Hollande said in Paris over the weekend that the goal is to hold elections once security is restored.

READ: Muslim militia: We are true government of Central African Republic

READ: 10 things to know about the Central African Republic

READ: GPS BLOG: No easy answers in Central African Republic

CNN's Jim Bittermann contributed to this report.

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