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Ice as you've never seen it before

By Christina Zdanowicz, CNN
updated 1:25 PM EST, Wed December 11, 2013
When it started snowing after the ice storm December 9, landscape photographer <a href='http://scenictraverse.com/' target='_blank'>Kristen Meister</a> grabbed her macro gear and headed out to her Woodbridge, Virginia, backyard. "I wanted to show people that there's <a href='http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-1067271'>beauty just outside</a> their back door. You don't have to go across the country to get this kind of stuff." When it started snowing after the ice storm December 9, landscape photographer Kristen Meister grabbed her macro gear and headed out to her Woodbridge, Virginia, backyard. "I wanted to show people that there's beauty just outside their back door. You don't have to go across the country to get this kind of stuff."
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Woodbridge, Virginia
Woodbridge, Virginia
Winchester, Kentucky
Reston, Virginia
Chantilly, Virginia
Catawba, Virginia
Catawba, Virginia
Front Royal, Virginia
Front Royal, Virginia
Chester Springs, Pennsylvania
Northampton, Massachusetts
Vancouver, Canada
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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Wintry weather got you down? Get creative by capturing icy images
  • Macro photography involves getting greater than life-size photos
  • Share your up-close photos of ice with CNN iReport

(CNN) -- As an ice storm swept the Midwest and East Coast this week, cooped-up photographers took the opportunity to take a closer look at Mother Nature's gift.

From branches coated in ice to snowflakes suspended in air, their up-close views revealed beauty you can't see from afar.

Some iReporters used macro photography, sometimes called extreme close-up photography, the practice of capturing larger-than-life versions of objects. It's like seeing the intricate details of a bee, or a flower, in a photo that's greater than life-size.

Photographers like Candice Trimble of Front Royal, Virginia, used a special macro lens to focus in on one part of the image. Everything else in the photo falls out of focus, creating a blur, which photographers call bokeh.

Another way to achieve the macro look is to use extension tubes. Landscape photographer Kristen Meister used these tubes, along with a macro lens, to magnify the image even more.

Whether you're stuck at home due to the wintry weather or you're looking for an escape to an icy wonderland, we'd like to see your up-close images of ice and snow near you. Share your photos and please tell us how you've been affected by the weather.

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