Skip to main content

Hondurans vote to pick new president

By CNN Staff
updated 11:13 PM EST, Sun November 24, 2013
A man shows a ballot during the vote counting in general elections in Tegucigalpa, Honduras on November 24, 2013.
A man shows a ballot during the vote counting in general elections in Tegucigalpa, Honduras on November 24, 2013.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • NEW: Early results show ruling party candidate Juan Hernandez with the lead
  • NEW: At the same time, the wife of ousted President Manuel Zelaya claims victory
  • Security concerns and economic woes are top issues for voters

(CNN) -- Preliminary results in Honduras' presidential election show ruling party candidate Juan Hernandez with the lead.

With more than 40% of the votes counted, he had 34%, while his closest competitor, Xiomara Castro, the wife of ousted President Manuel Zelaya, had 28%, according to the country's elections authority.

Both candidates, however, declared victory Sunday night -- setting the stage for a potential showdown in a country wracked by security concerns and economic hardship.

Castro announced her win on live television, while Hernandez did so on Twitter.

"Thank you my God and thanks to the Honduran people for this victory!" he wrote.

Eight candidates competed in the election.

Term limits prevented President Porfirio Lobo, who was elected several months after the 2009 coup that removed Zelaya from power, from seeking a second term.

He and Hernandez are from the same party.

According to Honduras' elections authority, 700 international and 14,000 national observers supervised this year's election, which also included votes for national and local lawmakers.

Honduras has the world's highest murder rate, according to the United Nations. The economy is also a top issue in the Central American country, where about 60% of the population lives below the poverty line.

Inmates running the asylum? In Honduran prisons, that's no joke

CNN's Claudia Dominguez, Elwyn Lopez and journalist Elvin Sandoval contributed to this report.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
updated 6:43 AM EDT, Mon July 14, 2014
For the first time in 24 years, Germany has lifted the World Cup after beating Argentina 1-0 in extra time.
updated 5:45 PM EDT, Fri July 11, 2014
Do you know your gurkentruppe from your bananenflanken? CNN helps.
updated 7:29 AM EDT, Mon July 14, 2014
Police moved in just one hour before Rui Chenggang was due to appear on air, leaving his anchor chair empty.
updated 5:27 AM EDT, Mon July 14, 2014
A salvage team will attempt to float the ill-fated Costa Concordia again. CNN's Erin McLaughlin reports.
updated 4:58 PM EDT, Sun July 13, 2014
Tichleman 1
A makeup artist, writer and model who loves monkeys and struggles with demons.
updated 6:29 AM EDT, Fri July 11, 2014
Why are Iraqi politicians dragging their feet while ISIS militants fortify their foothold across the country?
updated 9:32 AM EDT, Fri July 11, 2014
An elephant, who was chained for 50 years, cries tears of joy after being freed in India. CNN's Sumnima Udas reports.
updated 12:34 PM EDT, Fri July 11, 2014
People walk with their luggage at the Maiquetia international airport that serves Caracas on July 3, 2014. A survey by pollster Datanalisis revealed that 25% of the population surveyed (end of May) has at least one family member or friend who has emigrated from the country. AFP PHOTO/Leo RAMIREZ (Photo credit should read LEO RAMIREZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Plane passengers are used to paying additional fees, but one airport in Venezuela is now charging for the ultimate hidden extra -- air.
updated 3:32 AM EDT, Fri July 11, 2014
Beneath a dusty town in northeastern Pakistan, CNN explores a cold labyrinth of hidden tunnels that was once a safe haven for militants.
updated 12:44 AM EDT, Thu July 10, 2014
CNN's Ben Wedeman visits the Yazji family and finds out what it's like living life in the middle of conflict.
CNN joins the fight to end modern-day slavery by shining a spotlight on its horrors and highlighting success stories.
Browse through images from CNN teams around the world that you don't always see on news reports.
ADVERTISEMENT