Skip to main content

Beleaguered Jamaican Anti-Doping Commission hit by resignations

updated 8:36 AM EST, Sat November 23, 2013
Former world-record holder Asafa Powell was one of the Jamaican sprinters who failed a drug test this year.
Former world-record holder Asafa Powell was one of the Jamaican sprinters who failed a drug test this year.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • The entire board of the under-fire Jamaican Anti-Doping Commission resigns
  • The resignations come after several sprinters failed drug tests this year
  • Those caught included the high-profile pair of Veronica Campbell-Brown and Asafa Powell
  • A former head of the commission said few drug tests were carried out in early 2012

(CNN) -- The board of Jamaica's Anti-Doping Commission (JADCO) resigned after several of the Caribbean nation's sprinters were caught cheating earlier this year and a former head of the body highlighted a lack of testing.

Jamaica's minister responsible for sport, Natalie Neita Headley, announced the news while also saying her country vowed to step up the fight against drug cheats.

The resignations take effect at the end of 2013.

"Quite recently, JADCO's commissioners met and acknowledged that there is a public perception of the existence of conflicts of interests among some of the members of the commission," Headley said in a statement posted on the website of the Office of the Prime Minister.

Disgraced sprinter now fights doping
CNN Explains: Performance enhancing drugs
Federer: Do more drug testing

Even though Jamaicans Usain Bolt and Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce were named male and female athletes of the year, respectively, by track and field's governing body last week, ex world-record holder Asafa Powell and Sherone Simpson made the wrong type of headlines when they admitted to testing positive for banned substances in July.

Three-time Olympic gold medalist Veronica Campbell-Brown tested positive, too, although she was cleared to return by officials in Jamaica who deemed she didn't intend to enhance performance through taking a banned diuretic.

Members of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) examined JADCO's operations last month and Headley said Jamaica would give its "full support" to stiffer revisions to the WADA code expected to come into play in 2015.

In August, Renee Anne Shirley -- the former executive director of JADCO -- told Sports Illustrated that JADCO conducted a mere one out-of-competition test from March to July 2012, the months leading into the summer Olympics in London.

"At no time has WADA ever deemed Jamaica or JADCO to be non-compliant," Headley said. "At no time has WADA threatened to bar Jamaica or Jamaican athletes from participating in any international event — Olympic Games, World Championship or the like.

"As we continue to build on this rich sporting legacy, the Government of Jamaica will continue to do whatever it can to protect our good name and reputation and in the maintenance of a doping-free sporting environment."

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
updated 12:37 PM EDT, Wed May 7, 2014
Photography can really pack a punch. Catch up with all the best shots from around the world with our weekly sports gallery.
updated 8:00 AM EDT, Wed May 7, 2014
Of course not. But former Fulham owner Mohamed Al Fayed seems to think the removal of Michael Jackson's statue was a very "bad" idea.
updated 12:36 PM EDT, Wed May 7, 2014
Second-tier French side Clermont Foot appoint Helena Costa -- the country's first ever professional female coach of a male team.
updated 11:13 AM EDT, Mon April 28, 2014
San Francisco 49ers owner and co-chairman John York speaks to CNN about Michael Sam and the upcoming NFL Draft.
updated 1:33 PM EDT, Fri April 25, 2014
The All Blacks and their fans are focused on one thing, says Dan Carter: becoming the first rugby nation to win back-to-back World Cups.
updated 9:08 AM EDT, Fri April 4, 2014
The 2002 bomb attacks in Bali had many victims -- including a touring rugby team from Hong Kong.
Photographer Danny Lyon spent three days with Muhammad Ali in 1972 and shares his best photos and memories of the champ.
updated 7:54 AM EST, Tue February 25, 2014
With a growing audience boosted by the drama of ice hockey on show in Sochi at the Winter Olympics, can the sport capitalize on its popularity?
updated 6:25 AM EST, Mon January 20, 2014
Her paintings may sell for thousands of dollars, but she is best known for a modeling shot 50 years ago that helped launch a business empire.
updated 12:01 PM EST, Thu January 9, 2014
When the eye of the storm closes in most people head home -- but for these surfers it's a different story.
updated 9:45 AM EST, Mon January 6, 2014
Gareth Evans is a school teacher in South Africa. In 1983, he attended a "rebel tour" cricket match against the West Indies.
updated 10:07 AM EST, Tue December 17, 2013
In the wake of protests in his native Ukraine, heavyweight champion Vitali Klitschko has turned his back on boxing to focus on his political ambitions.
updated 5:20 AM EDT, Fri August 9, 2013
Former pole vaulter Sergei Bubka is running to be president of the International Olympic Committee.
The Olympics must use its global reach and immense popularity to help save a generation, says sporting icon Sergei Bubka.
updated 12:32 PM EDT, Wed August 7, 2013
CNN's Fred Pleitgen exposes a history of German government-funded doping throughout the Cold War.
updated 12:28 PM EDT, Tue April 9, 2013
A competitor crosses the erg Znaigui during the second stage of the 26rd edition of the 'Marathon des Sables', on April 4, 2011, some 300 Kilometers, South of Ouarzazate in Morocco. The marathon is considered one of the hardest in the world, with 900 participants having to walk 250 kms (150 miles) for seven days in the Moroccan Sahara.
A six-day run that covers more than 220 km through the scorching heat of the Sahara desert has been billed as the "World's toughest race."
updated 7:49 AM EDT, Wed April 10, 2013
He plays the only sport approved by the Taliban, a game he learned as a war refugee in Pakistan.
ADVERTISEMENT