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CNN Poll: After shutdown, America is less optimistic about economy

By Paul Steinhauser, CNN Political Editor
updated 8:40 AM EDT, Tue October 22, 2013
Tourists flock to memorials in Washington on Saturday, October 19, the first weekend after the end of the partial government shutdown. The Washington Monument and other landmarks across the country have reopened to the public after the 16-day shutdown. The government impasse ended when President Barack Obama signed a spending and debt ceiling agreement that Congress passed, averting a possible default. Tourists flock to memorials in Washington on Saturday, October 19, the first weekend after the end of the partial government shutdown. The Washington Monument and other landmarks across the country have reopened to the public after the 16-day shutdown. The government impasse ended when President Barack Obama signed a spending and debt ceiling agreement that Congress passed, averting a possible default.
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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Optimism about the economy hits a low for the year, according to a new CNN/ORC poll
  • The partial government shutdown contributed to the national pessimism
  • Nearly three out of four say that economic conditions are poor right now

Washington (CNN) -- The number of Americans who say the economy is in good shape has dropped to the lowest level of the year, according to a new national poll.

And a CNN/ORC International survey also indicates that economic pessimism is growing in the wake of the government shutdown, with nearly six in 10 forecasting poor economic conditions a year from now.

The poll's Tuesday morning release comes a few hours before the Labor Department announces the September unemployment report. The release of last month's jobless figures was delayed because of the 16-day partial government shutdown.

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In the poll that was conducted this past weekend, 71% of those questioned say that economic conditions are poor right now, with only 29% saying that current conditions are good -- a drop of 4 percentage points since late September, just before the shutdown began.

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"That number has not been particularly high in 2013, but throughout the year it has always been over 30%, making the current level of 29% the worst number since December of last year," says CNN Polling Director Keating Holland.

Only 40% say that the economy will be in good shape a year from now. That's down from 50% in June and represents the lowest level of optimism since October 2011. Some 59% say the economy will be in poor shape next fall.

The poll was conducted for CNN by ORC International October 18-20, with 841 adults nationwide questioned by telephone. The survey's overall sampling error is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points.

Poll: 75% say most Republicans in Congress don't deserve re-election

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