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No charges for firefighter who ran over Asiana crash survivor

By CNN Staff
updated 12:26 PM EDT, Sun October 20, 2013
In this handout photo released by the National Transportation Safety Board, Asiana Airlines Flight 214 sits just off the runway at San Francisco International Airport on Sunday, July 7. The Boeing 777 coming from Seoul, South Korea, crashed on landing on Saturday, July 6. Three passengers, all girls, died as a result of the first notable U.S. air crash in four years. In this handout photo released by the National Transportation Safety Board, Asiana Airlines Flight 214 sits just off the runway at San Francisco International Airport on Sunday, July 7. The Boeing 777 coming from Seoul, South Korea, crashed on landing on Saturday, July 6. Three passengers, all girls, died as a result of the first notable U.S. air crash in four years.
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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • A 16-year-old survived a plane crash but died after she was run over by a fire truck
  • The case was submitted to prosecutors for review
  • The San Francisco fire chief has called the girl's death a "tragic accident"

(CNN) -- The firefighter who accidentally ran over and killed a 16-year-old girl who survived July's Asiana Airlines crash in San Francisco will not be charged in the case, San Mateo County District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe said Friday.

The decision comes more than two weeks after authorities completed their investigation into the incident.

A California coroner ruled that Ye Mengyuan of China was alive when she was flung from the plane that crashed as it landed short of the runway at San Francisco International Airport on July 6, but was killed by "multiple blunt injuries" moments later when run over by a rescue vehicle.

That month, San Francisco Fire Department Chief Joanne Hayes-White called the girl's death "a tragic accident" and apologized to Ye's family.

"Obviously this is very difficult news for us. We're heartbroken. We're in the business of saving lives," Hayes-White said at the time. "There's not a lot of words to describe how badly we feel about it."

Two other people died as a result of the crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214. More than 180 people aboard the flight were injured.

Asiana Airlines: We're paying $10,000 to each passenger

CNN's Augie Martin, Michael Martinez and Jason Hanna contributed to this report.

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Asiana Flight 214 crash
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The two teen girls were close friends, each looking forward to a summer trip to California to improve their English.
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After 10 long hours in the sky, the Jang children couldn't wait to get off the plane.
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updated 9:45 AM EDT, Wed July 17, 2013
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updated 6:42 AM EDT, Fri July 12, 2013
Shortly after Asiana Airlines Flight 214 crashed in San Francisco, passengers and witnesses pleaded with 911 responders to send help -- some frantically, some insistently.
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