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Four things we learned from government shutdown

By Michael Martinez, CNN
updated 2:46 PM EDT, Fri October 18, 2013
Tourists flock to memorials in Washington on Saturday, October 19, the first weekend after the end of the partial government shutdown. The Washington Monument and other landmarks across the country have reopened to the public after the 16-day shutdown. The government impasse ended when President Barack Obama signed a spending and debt ceiling agreement that Congress passed, averting a possible default. Tourists flock to memorials in Washington on Saturday, October 19, the first weekend after the end of the partial government shutdown. The Washington Monument and other landmarks across the country have reopened to the public after the 16-day shutdown. The government impasse ended when President Barack Obama signed a spending and debt ceiling agreement that Congress passed, averting a possible default.
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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Amid our deprivations during the shutdown, we appreciate our national parks
  • The party of Lincoln seems to be a house divided
  • Ouch, the U.S. economy lost $24 billion
  • Like a Hollywood horror film, there's going to be a sequel

(CNN) -- Whew, it's all over, folks -- the twin crises of government shutdown and national default countdown. At least for now.

This one wasn't easy. And we'll be talking about it for a while.

That's just one of the four lessons we take away from this calamity in our capital.

A walk in the park

We love our parks. Boy, do we love our national parks. That was evident in a public outcry, on social media and elsewhere.

Shutdown is over... what's next?
Shutdown: Winners and losers
What's next for the GOP
GOP fractures after shutdown showdown

Isn't it nice that in our deprivation, we found something to appreciate?

The shuttered national parks didn't stop some visitors from trying to sneak onto back roads or lookout points to steal a quiet view of nature. However, armed park rangers who were mandated to work during the shutdown thwarted many motorists by swinging the road gates closed.

9 things we missed during the shutdown

The Grand Old Party isn't so grand

It's a great thing to have conservatives and liberals giving us different viewpoints on how to run the country, but the Republican Party -- the party of President Lincoln -- now seems a house divided.

Cruz won't rule out another shutdown

McConnell: Further shutdowns 'off the table'

Can the GOP heal an internal rift between establishment conservatives and the new conservatives of the tea party? For the moment, the Republicans are cited as the top cause for the shutdown, evidenced by a CNN/ORC poll showing the GOP is the biggest target of American anger, with 63% of respondents venting their ire at them. Democrats fared only slightly better, however, with 58% expressing anger at them, too. And 53% were angry at President Barack Obama.

Winners and losers from the shutdown crisis

Economic damage

For a country fresh out of a great recession, the 16-day shutdown was costly: It took $24 billion out of the economy, Standard & Poor's says.

As a result, the United States will grow 2.4% -- instead of 3% -- this quarter, meaning there won't be as many new jobs that many American families desperately need in the post-recession era.

A sequel

What's in the budget bill?
How to avoid another government crisis
The shutdown's biggest loser is ...

As difficult as this drama was, there will be a Part II.

The Hollywood horror genre doesn't have anything over Washington.

The government is funded until January 15 -- meaning Americans will be forced to witness another round of Democrat-Republican budget negotiations.

It gets better, or worse, depending on your viewpoint: The debt ceiling will have to be revisited, too, by February 7.

All this makes some economists worry that Americans will now be afraid to invest, create jobs, and go shopping this holiday season.

Perhaps John Chambers, managing director of Standard and Poor's rating service, put it best:

"We think that we'll be back here in January debating the same issues," Chambers said. "This is, I fear, a permanent feature of our budgetary process."

Playing nice: Budget talks may start with an extra-friendly tone

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