Skip to main content

'The Other Hundred' - World's untold photo stories

By Naomi Ng, for CNN
updated 2:11 AM EDT, Mon October 14, 2013
Suhrob exercises one of the horses in preparation for Buzkashi -- a Central Asian sport where up to a hundred or more riders fight to seize a headless goat carcass then carry it to a goal. As is common in the buzkashi world, rather than riding their own horses, Suhrob and his brothers ride animals owned by a wealthy individual. Suhrob exercises one of the horses in preparation for Buzkashi -- a Central Asian sport where up to a hundred or more riders fight to seize a headless goat carcass then carry it to a goal. As is common in the buzkashi world, rather than riding their own horses, Suhrob and his brothers ride animals owned by a wealthy individual.
HIDE CAPTION
Tajikistan
Vietnam
Burkina Faso
Maldives
South Korea
Afghanistan
Hong Kong
Russia
United States
Eritrea
Sri Lanka
Mali
<<
<
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
>
>>
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • The Other Hundred, a project featuring 100 photo stories, launched its first exhibition
  • The project takes aim at media rankings such as the Forbes Billionaire List
  • CEO: "We're trying to provoke people to define for themselves what it means to have a rich and fulfilled life"
  • The exhibition will move next to Mumbai, New York, Beijing and Berlin in 2014

Hong Kong (CNN) -- The Other Hundred, a photo-book project featuring 100 photo stories of people across 91 countries, launched its first exhibition in Hong Kong on Thursday.

The project takes aim at media rankings such as the Forbes Billionaire List and is instead dedicated to people whose lives deserve recognition but who would never make the cut, said Chandran Nair, creator of the project and CEO of the Global Institute For Tomorrow (GIFT), an independent pan-Asian think tank based in Hong Kong.

"The goal of The Other Hundred is both to inform and to provoke thought. The implication of many of the rich lists and articles put out by the media is that being rich is the only way to succeed or live a life of meaning. The reality is that the majority of the people are not rich and we wanted to tell their side of the story," Nair said.

"It's ridiculous there are such lists like the world's 100 most beautiful people when they really look nothing like me or you," Nair added.

Photos highlight unspoken majority
Forbes releases world's richest list
Forbes reveals 100 most powerful women

GIFT received 12,000 submissions from 1,500 photographers in 156 countries. Nair, together with five other judges selected 100 for the accompanying photo book, published in July. The book includes short essays by acclaimed writers, such as author Pankaj Mishra, renowned Chinese poet Bei Dao and award winning journalist Amy Goodman.

While the project aimed to shed light on the unspoken majority, Nair said that it does not attempt to celebrate poverty or criticize wealth.

"We're trying to provoke people to define for themselves what it means to have a rich and fulfilled life. We're not trying to criticize those who seek material wealth, but the reality is that not everyone aspires to be rich, and not everybody can," Nair said. "You can tell the world is crying out for a more nuanced look at the human condition."

One of the winning photographers, Theodore Kaye, said that he appreciated how the project also challenged the commercialization of the editorial market for professional photographers like himself.

"There's a lot of pressure to deliver what the media wants and everybody at some point is going to bow down to it," Kaye said. "The project shows how life as it is for normal people and things as they truly are."

What was most important, said Nair, was photographers' connection to the photo narratives.

"We didn't want to pick the photographer who parachuted into Afghanistan and got the photo of the exotic young girl in the shadows. We want a name to put to the faces and a story to tell," Nair said.

The exhibition will move next to Mumbai, New York, Beijing and Berlin in 2014. GIFT plans to follow the project with "The Other Hundred Entrepreneurs" in 2015.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
updated 11:50 AM EDT, Tue September 30, 2014
Experts believe that ISIS may be using a Spanish enclave to bring jihad to Europe.
updated 9:00 AM EDT, Tue September 30, 2014
With an efficient subway, inexpensive taxis and a good public bus system, Hong Kong is normally an easy city to navigate ...
updated 7:32 PM EDT, Sun September 28, 2014
CNN's Ivan Watson was in the middle of a pro-democracy protest in Hong Kong when things got out of hand.
updated 4:12 PM EDT, Tue September 30, 2014
The world's animal population has halved in 40 years as humans put unsustainable demands on Earth, a new report warns.
updated 8:49 AM EDT, Tue September 30, 2014
Every day, refugees and migrants risk their lives as they seek a new life. Now, a new report puts a figure to the number of victims.
updated 10:42 AM EDT, Tue September 30, 2014
Mainstream commentators must promote positive role models to Muslims feeling victimized, writes Ghaffar Hussain.
updated 2:13 AM EDT, Mon September 29, 2014
Two men familiar with inside knowledge of ISIS speak with CNN's Arwa Damon.
Explore CNN's interactive that explains ISIS' roots, what it controls, and where its support comes from.
updated 4:10 PM EDT, Thu September 25, 2014
In his first-ever interview as the Emir of Qatar, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al-Thani defended his country against allegations of funding terrorism.
updated 11:03 AM EDT, Sat September 27, 2014
The North Korean leader hasn't been seen for weeks, leading to speculation that he is in poor health.
updated 9:54 PM EDT, Tue September 23, 2014
Haider al-Abadi hopes airstrikes don't lead to "of another terrorist element" instead of ISIS.
updated 9:19 AM EDT, Thu September 25, 2014
The United States couldn't do it on its first try. Neither could the Soviets.
updated 11:29 AM EDT, Wed September 24, 2014
CNN's Nima Elbagir reflects on a harrowing trip to Liberia where she covered the deadliest Ebola outbreak in history.
updated 10:23 AM EDT, Fri September 26, 2014
Contrary to public opinion, rats can actually save lives -- Apopo's rats have actually saved thousands.
updated 9:36 AM EDT, Tue September 30, 2014
Each day, CNN brings you an image capturing a moment to remember, defining the present in our changing world.
Browse through images from CNN teams around the world that you don't always see on news reports.
ADVERTISEMENT