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Sebastian Vettel: I'm not thinking about the world title

updated 8:17 AM EDT, Thu October 10, 2013
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Sebastian Vettel refuses to be distracted by thoughts of a fourth world title
  • The Red Bull driver can wrap up the F1 championship at Sunday's Japanese GP
  • Vettel admits being booed by spectators throughout 2013 has been unpleasant
  • The German lauds Suzuka Circuit as "one of the best tracks in the world"

(CNN) -- In typically collected fashion, Formula One's triple world champion Sebastian Vettel is taking each race as it comes.

The unflappable Red Bull driver could become only the third driver to win four consecutive championships at this weekend's Japanese Grand Prix -- following in the footsteps of legendary drivers Michael Schumacher and Juan Manuel Fangio.

But like any great champion, the German is concentrating on the next grand prix.

Read: Will F1 rule change end Vettel's dominance?

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"I'm not really focusing on the title, I'm trying to focus on the race," the 26-year-old, who is bidding for a fifth consecutive grand prix win at the Suzuka Circuit, told CNN in Yokohama.

"We have a fantastic car, we are in great shape. We have to enjoy that and try our best."

In order for Vettel to be crowned champion this weekend he must take the checkered flag and hope Ferrari's Fernando Alonso -- his nearest rival -- finishes no higher than ninth.

Vettel recently suggested the superiority he enjoys over two-time world champion Alonso could be the reason why he has been booed on the podium at a number of races during the 2013 season.

Read: Vettel lauds Red Bull's hard work

A promotional image for the new Formula One film "Rush." Australian actor Chris Hemsworth plays the hedonistic James Hunt (left) while Daniel Bruhl plays his on-track nemesis Niki Lauda. A promotional image for the new Formula One film "Rush." Australian actor Chris Hemsworth plays the hedonistic James Hunt (left) while Daniel Bruhl plays his on-track nemesis Niki Lauda.
'Rush' the movie
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Red Bull's Sebastian Vettel lifts the trophy under lights following his victory at the Singapore Grand Prix, F1's only night race. Red Bull's Sebastian Vettel lifts the trophy under lights following his victory at the Singapore Grand Prix, F1's only night race.
Vettel's Singapore success
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His popularity among fans was also dented earlier this year, when he ignored team orders to pass teammate Mark Webber and win March's Malaysian Grand Prix.

While he admits that the booing is disappointing, Vettel attributes it to sporting rivalry rather than a particular dislike for him or his all-conquering Red Bull team.

"It's not nice for sure," he said. "But it's sport, there is no deep meaning behind it.

People don't think. Somebody starts, some people join, others don't. It's not a big deal."

Vettel will get a lift this weekend when he takes to the track at Suzuka, one of his favorite circuits on the F1 calendar.

"It's one of the best tracks in the world," he explained, "with all the fast corners, I always enjoy it a lot."

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