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Lusting after the new iPhone

By Dean Obeidallah
updated 10:55 AM EDT, Wed September 25, 2013
The latest additions to the iPhone line -- the colorful iPhone 5C, left, and higher-end iPhone 5S -- mark the first time Apple has launched two new versions of the phone. Initial reviews have been positive. The latest additions to the iPhone line -- the colorful iPhone 5C, left, and higher-end iPhone 5S -- mark the first time Apple has launched two new versions of the phone. Initial reviews have been positive.
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Three 5S colors
Features of the new iPhones
Exterior design
Upgraded camera
Touch ID
A more helpful Siri
64-bit chip
iPhone 5C colors
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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Dean Obeidallah: The new iPhone 5S has rekindled my enthusiasm for the devices
  • He says the iPhone has been his companion, resource, chronicler for years
  • Obeidallah says he wants a gold-colored phone, looks forward to its new features

Editor's note: Dean Obeidallah, a former attorney, is a political comedian and frequent commentator on various TV networks including CNN. He is the co-director of the new comedy documentary "The Muslims Are Coming!" which was released this month. Follow him on Twitter @deanofcomedy.

(CNN) -- I'm going to be honest: I didn't expect to get excited over the new iPhone 5S.

In fact, just last summer I wrote about how I had fallen out of love with my iPhone.

I spoke of the thrill being gone. And even though I knew it wasn't the fault of the iPhone, but iDean, it didn't make it any better.

Dean Obeidallah
Dean Obeidallah

I was clearly taking my iPhone for granted. In fact, I found myself checking out other phones -- sneaking a glimpse at my best friend's Samsung Galaxy. I even would Google images of the new BlackBerry when I was home alone.

But the new iPhone 5S has changed all that. I dare say it's making me fall back in love with the iPhone. And it appears I'm not alone; a record 9 million-plus new iPhones were sold on the first weekend they were available.

Another view: Why I'll never ditch my BlackBerry

Look, how could anyone resist the new iPhone 5S? It's the gold standard for smartphones -- and in fact it comes in gold. That color phone is for sale on Ebay for $1,500, slightly higher than an actual ounce of gold.

How to hack an iPhone fingerprint sensor
Turn your iPhone into a stun gun
4-year-old has an iMeltdown

The new iPhone may look the same as the old one on the outside, but just like the guys from "Duck Dynasty" have taught us, just because things look the same, it doesn't mean they are. The new iPhone boasts a faster processor, an updated camera and even a Touch ID fingerprint system for better security.

While I don't have the new iPhone yet, its rollout has made me appreciate my older iPhone and the great times we had together. Like when it helped me find my way with its "maps app" when my older GPS had lost satellite reception because it was "too cloudy."

Or when an iPhone app became a white noise machine helping me sleep me on a long plane flight. And, of course, I can't thank my iPhone enough for all the hours it spent with me in the bathroom as a replacement for reading a newspaper.

In fact, the iPhone 5S is making me forget about all the arguments I had with Siri. And when I say "arguments," I mean me yelling at my iPhone because Siri kept nagging me with comments like: "Sorry, Dean, I don't understand what you're asking."

BlackBerry: Why breaking up is hard to do

Is the BlackBerry better than the iPhone? It's like comparing "Honey Boo Boo" with HBO's "Newsroom." Sure, "Honey Boo Boo" may be popular, but watching it will make you dumber.

The iPhone has been a big part of my life for more than six years. And during that time we have shared so many great moments, which are all conveniently stored as photos in my iPhone.

So keep your BlackBerrys, Androids and Galaxys. I'm an iPhone man and will likely be one for years to come, and not just because of the $350 early termination fee. I may not be perfect, but iDean appreciate loyalty and I appreciate the inner and outer beauty of my iPhone.

Follow us on Twitter @CNNOpinion.

Join us on Facebook/CNNOpinion.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Dean Obeidallah.

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