Hillary Clinton on possible presidency: 'I'm realistic'

Could Hillary Clinton run again?
Could Hillary Clinton run again?

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Could Hillary Clinton run again? 01:53

Story highlights

  • "I don't know what she's going to do," Bill Clinton tells CNN
  • Hillary Clinton talks presidential possibilities in interview with New York magazine
  • It's her first interview since stepping down as secretary of state
  • She says she'll "continue to weigh what the factors are" that might lead to a presidential run

Hillary Clinton is in no hurry to decide about a potential 2016 bid for the White House, saying it is a decision "not to be made lightly."

As the political drumbeat builds for a possible Clinton candidacy, with polls showing that she is the leading contender for the Democratic nomination, the former secretary of state was asked in a New York magazine interview published online Sunday whether she wrestles with the idea.

"I do," she said, "but I'm both pragmatic and realistic. I think I have a pretty good idea of the political and governmental challenges that are facing our leaders, and I'll do whatever I can from whatever position I find myself in to advocate for the values and the policies I think are right for the country.

"I will just continue to weigh what the factors are that would influence me making a decision one way or the other."

Speech fans the flames of speculation

Much has been made about a potential Clinton run since she stepped down this year as secretary of state, a position she accepted from President Barack Obama after losing to him in a bruising Democratic presidential primary in 2008.

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Some of Clinton's closest confidants insist she will run, even if she hasn't realized it yet, the article said.

Sarah Palin: Clinton ill-suited for president

Of Clinton's failed 2008 bid, her aide Melanne Verveer told the magazine, "She doesn't repeat her mistakes."

A CNN/ORC International survey released last week showed that 65% of Democrats and independents who lean toward that party say they would likely back Clinton as their presidential nominee. Vice President Joe Biden came in a distant second, at 10%, with freshman Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts at 7%, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo at 6%, and Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley at 2%.

The CNN survey is in line with previous polls from other organizations conducted earlier this year that indicated Clinton is far ahead of all the other possible Democratic candidates.

Opinion: Obama did Clinton a huge favor

Clinton's husband, former President Bill Clinton, said the polls are flattering but "don't mean much now. We're a long way ahead."

"I think she would be the first to tell you that there is no such thing as a done deal, ever, by anybody. But I don't know what she's going to do," he told CNN's Fareed Zakaria.

In her first interview since leaving the State Department, Hillary Clinton told the magazine: "I'm not in any hurry. I think it's a serious decision, not to be made lightly but it's also not one that has to be made soon."

She said the election is more than three years away, and the push to keep moving on to the next event is not good for the country.

"It's like when you meet somebody at a party and they look over your shoulder to see who else is there, and you want to talk to them about something that's really important; in fact, maybe you came to the party to talk about that particular person, and they just want to know what's next," she said. "I feel like that's our political process right now. I just don't think it is good."

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