Skip to main content

How to avoid baggage fees: Wear your luggage

By Karla Cripps, CNN
updated 7:02 AM EDT, Fri September 20, 2013
It takes a certain amount of panache to carry off the Jaktogo. But hey, think of the savings.
It takes a certain amount of panache to carry off the Jaktogo. But hey, think of the savings.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • "Only fools pay for extra luggage," say the makers of Jaktogo
  • Company offers a series of designs that allow travelers to "wear" their luggage
  • Jaktogo prices range from US$90-319, depending on style and materials

(CNN) -- With the exception of toilet paper, low-cost airlines have managed to tack a fee on pretty much every formerly complimentary amenity.

Checked luggage, of course, was among the first to earn a price tag.

U.S. airlines such as Spirit and Frontier are already charging passengers extra for carry-ons. Word has it other airlines will soon follow suit.

Airlines sugarcoat these bitter pills with explanations that sound pretty good.

"Spirit Airlines empowers customers to save money on air travel by offering ultra low base fares with a range of optional services, allowing customers the freedom to choose only the extras they value," says Spirit Airlines.

But c'mon -- who doesn't value a bag?

If someone is going by plane, presumably they're going away for at least a night.

And presumably they're going to want to put on a new pair of clothes.

Jaktogos come in a variety of styles and materials, including denim.
Jaktogos come in a variety of styles and materials, including denim.

A fresh pair of underwear, at the very least.

To the rescue of those of us sick of paying baggage fees comes Jaktogo, a company with an innovative way to pull one over on "the man" -- wearable luggage.

"Only fools pay for extra luggage," reads the company's tagline. "Clever people have a Jaktogo."

What is a Jaktogo, you ask?

It's a bag that unfolds into a jacket that's covered in various-sized pockets, allowing travelers to pack everything into their coats. Even their laptop.

Adios, luggage fees.

There are a few other "luggage jackets" on the market -- Stuffa Jacket, Rufus Roo, etc -- but Jaktogo appears to be the leader in capacity. The makers say it's also a handy way to carry things when you've run out of suitcase space.

The wearable bags come in a variety of styles and materials like leather and denim. There's a dress version. A poncho, too. Prices range from $90-319.

Bear in mind, you're going to have to sacrifice style in the name of savings.

The Jaktogo isn't sexy.

And we can't imagine they're comfortable.

But hey, you already gave up everything else for that cheap flight. Might as well chuck your dignity into the low-cost turbines too.

Would you slap on a Jaktogo if it meant avoiding luggage fees? Share your thoughts below.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
updated 9:17 AM EDT, Fri September 26, 2014
The Y-40 Deep Joy, the world's deepest swimming pool at the Hotel Millepini Terme in Montegrotto Terme, Italy.
An Italian spa complex adds new depths to the hotel swimming pool concept with a 42-meter plunge chamber.
updated 8:36 PM EDT, Wed September 24, 2014
Whether spiraling up mountains or sky-scraping attractions, these stairs give new meaning to the phrase "watch your step".
updated 10:29 AM EDT, Mon September 22, 2014
Even during the harshest periods of the communist era, being Shanghainese had a special cachet in China.
updated 8:52 AM EDT, Wed September 24, 2014
Up the Inside Passage on a heritage tugboat, sport fishermen chase British Columbia's monster salmon.
updated 3:41 AM EDT, Wed September 24, 2014
New York to London in three hours? The European aviation giant is joining the race to make it happen.
updated 6:07 AM EDT, Tue September 23, 2014
Which cities provide the most memorable party times? A self-proclaimed "nightlife connoisseur" names his top 10.
updated 11:44 PM EDT, Sun September 21, 2014
Whether you're looking for a post-meeting pint or a wild night out, creativity is on the menu at these hot Hong Kong venues.
updated 6:28 AM EDT, Tue September 23, 2014
An image showing the Istanbul district of Beyoglu where gentrification is changing the face of the neighborhood and leading the closure of many old shops and establishments.
Artists and migrants are moving out as a once-crumbling neighborhood goes upscale.
updated 1:02 AM EDT, Sat September 20, 2014
They irrigate our farms, are an important means of transport and a source of eco-friendly power.
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT