Skip to main content

Interactive: The decline of international adoption

By CNN Staff
updated 1:52 AM EDT, Mon September 16, 2013
The chart above shows the total annual decline of overseas adoptions globally; the graphic to the right details the changes in sending and receiving countries. Sources: The Hague Adoption Convention and Peter Selman, Newcastle University.
Interactive by Clarence Fong and Jason Kwok, CNN

Editor's note: Editor's Note: In this series, CNN investigates international adoption, hearing from families, children and key experts on its decline, and whether the trend could -- or should -- be reversed.

(CNN) -- International adoptions steadily rose since the 1950s before exploding in the 1990s with the end of the Cold War and the opening of China and Russia. After peaking in 2004 with more than 45,000 overseas adoptions, the numbers globally have fallen by half in less than a decade.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
International adoption
updated 6:52 AM EDT, Tue September 17, 2013
After rising for decades, the number of overseas adoptions has dropped by almost half since 2004. In this series, CNN probes the reasons behind the decline and whether the trend could -- or should -- be reversed.
updated 1:52 AM EDT, Mon September 16, 2013
International adoptions steadily rose since the 1950s before exploding in the 1990s with the end of the Cold War and the opening of China and Russia. But for the past decade its been in freefall.
updated 8:38 AM EDT, Tue September 17, 2013
While the number of international adoptions is plummeting, there is one nation from which parents abroad can adopt a healthy infant in a relatively short time: The United States.
updated 2:41 PM EDT, Wed September 18, 2013
Advocates say international adoption system is holding orphans hostage in red tape. Critics say adoption from developing nations feeds nefarious practices. A "business" in need of reform.
updated 3:24 AM EDT, Wed September 18, 2013
Tarikuwa Lemma thought she was moving from Ethiopia to the U.S. for a "living study" program in the United States. She was wrong.
updated 3:46 AM EDT, Wed September 18, 2013
Born in a Cambodian refugee camp, Srey Powers became an all-star soccer player in the U.S. In 2010, she traveled to Cambodia to find her birth family.
updated 1:11 AM EDT, Mon September 16, 2013
Actress, activist and wife of actor Hugh Jackman tells why she is one of the leading voices in the fight to keep international adoption alive.
updated 8:21 PM EDT, Mon September 16, 2013
South Korea was a pioneer of international adoptions. But now U.S. adoptees are leading the fight to halt the practice.
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT