Skip to main content

Paddling wild in Sweden's kayaking paradise

By Jini Reddy and CNN staff
updated 5:57 AM EDT, Thu September 12, 2013
Paddle-mad Swedes love hitting Bohuslän -- kayaks under arm -- but the region is big enough, in one of Europe's biggest countries, that you can easily find a spot to yourself. Paddle-mad Swedes love hitting Bohuslän -- kayaks under arm -- but the region is big enough, in one of Europe's biggest countries, that you can easily find a spot to yourself.
HIDE CAPTION
Paddle playground: Bohuslän
Starting point: Gothenburg
Wild, uninhabited
No Swede is an island (or perhaps some are)
Grebbestad tradition
Seafood stars
Fjällbacka archipelago
Murderously pretty
Weather Islands
Island anarchy
Sheltered waters
Open ocean
Rock stars
<<
<
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
>
>>
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • With 8,000 islands, Sweden's Bohuslän region is best explored by kayak
  • Fresh seafood is also part of draw
  • Seals, reindeer and mink are among wildlife
  • Gothenburg is a good place to get a taste of fika -- Swedish coffee culture

(CNN) -- Bohuslän might not trip off the tongue, but with its 8,000 islands, many wild and uninhabited, the Swedish coastal strip is a paradise for kayakers -- or for anyone seeking high-grade solitude.

The Swedes come in droves (around half a million last year) and international visitors are on the rise -- more than 200,000 foreigners annually so far, many from neighboring Norway and the UK.

They're on to a good thing -- with its clean water and air, more pretty fishing villages than you could stuff in a postcard rack and countless wriggling nets-worth of seafood, this is a pristine piece of Europe.

Stretching from Gothenburg in the south to the border with Norway, it's large enough that you can easily get away, paddling or otherwise, from crowds -- even in summer.

You'd be missing out to head to the Bohuslän Coast and -- regardless of your ability -- not jump in a kayak (rather than a canoe, which are more suited to Sweden's lakes than coastal waters).

Read more: 10 things to know before visiting Sweden

For starters, there are no strong currents or dangerous tidal waters here.

Thanks to the Gulf Stream, the water is warm and the islands mostly easy to get to.

Plenty of sheltered coves let novice paddlers practice, while the more experienced paddlers can head out to the North Sea.

Sweden\'s right-to-roam law means you can pitch a tent largely where you like among the islands of Bohuslän.
Sweden's right-to-roam law means you can pitch a tent largely where you like among the islands of Bohuslän.

Born in a boat

Many Swedes appear to have been born in a kayak.

Around Bohuslän, kayakers cluster in the car-free Koster Islands in the Kosterhavet, Sweden's first marine national park.

Popular, too, are the rocky islands of the Fjällbacka archipelago, the Weather Islands (Väderöarna), Sweden's most westerly, and the larger islands of Orust and Tjörn.

Read more: How to see Stockholm like Stieg Larsson

Some of the islands have guesthouses or, thanks to the country's freedom-to-roam law, you can pitch your tent and hike pretty much wherever you like (bar some protected spots).

Reindeer, mink and seal are among the animals you might encounter in this still wild place -- plus ever-present seabirds.

Fishermen still work much of the coast.
Fishermen still work much of the coast.

Flying in

Most overseas visitors fly into Gothenburg.

Once dominated by its industrial seaport, Sweden's second-largest city is now an increasingly lively and cosmopolitan place.

It's worth spending a day or two here to visit Scandinavia's largest amusement park, Liseberg, or to get a taste of Swedish coffee culture -- the famous fika.

A recommended stopping place as you drive up the coast is Fjällbacka, a fishing village about an hour and a half north of Gothenburg.

It's an undeniably pretty place -- any cloying potential is offset by the fact that resident crime writer Camilla Läckberg sets her grisly murders here.

Read more: How to build a Swedish ice hotel

A short drive further north is Grebbestad, where 90% of Sweden's oysters come from.

There are plenty of opportunities in the bars and restaurants around town to test legendary French chef Paul Bocuse's assertion that Sweden's oysters are the best in the world.

You can visit WestSweden.com for more information on planning a trip to Bohuslän.

Kayak guides will show you around the islands. Christina Ingemarsdotter (christinaingemarsdotter@hotmail.com; +46 707 332 240) charges $390 for a wild camping and kayaking trip, per person, for two nights and three days, including instruction, food, equipment and kayaks.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
updated 6:01 AM EDT, Tue August 19, 2014
Photographer gives Hong Kong skyscrapers a radical new look.
updated 8:21 AM EDT, Sat August 16, 2014
A cage-free shark photographer gets up close and personal with the ocean's most feared predators.
updated 10:28 AM EDT, Fri August 15, 2014
Conde Nast Traveler reader survey praises antipodean cities but gives South Africa's biggest city a wide berth.
updated 9:22 PM EDT, Thu August 14, 2014
After the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Canal, here are 10 other ways to fall in love with the country.
updated 11:49 PM EDT, Wed August 13, 2014
In Taiwan, tourists pay to ride along in local cabs, letting fate -- and locals fares -- decide where they'll go.
updated 4:48 PM EDT, Wed August 13, 2014
It's largely devoid of human life, dark, cold and subject to dangerous levels of geological volatility -- the Arctic is surely the worst possible destination for an arts festival.
Zurich, Switzerland
It may be Switzerland's banking capital, but Zurich's real wealth lies in the village-like charm of its cobbled streets and Alpine scenery.
updated 2:54 PM EDT, Wed August 13, 2014
We've all wondered what it's like to die. Now an outfit in Shanghai says it can provide the experience.
updated 9:15 PM EDT, Wed August 13, 2014
Our special report details who, what and how much it takes to bring you the best in IFE (we'll explain).
updated 2:32 AM EDT, Wed August 13, 2014
What pizza is to New York and the cheesesteak is to Philly, the food truck has become to Los Angeles -- essential
updated 5:03 AM EDT, Wed August 20, 2014
If you've ever clicked on a list of forests to see before you die, chances are you've already seen a photo of this stunner.
updated 8:18 PM EDT, Thu August 7, 2014
The military coup in Thailand has led to a massive change in Phuket, weeding out decades of misuse and abuse at one of the world's most popular holiday destinations.
updated 5:56 AM EDT, Thu July 31, 2014
With a mix of Indian, African, French and Chinese influences, Mauritius represents a cultural smorgasbord.
updated 8:44 AM EDT, Fri August 8, 2014
There's nothing like high drama on a beach.
updated 5:57 AM EDT, Mon August 11, 2014
Home to big game, sparkling beaches, and stunning sunsets, Malawi makes for an idyllic travel destination.
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT