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Members of King family involved in bus accident

By Bryan Monroe and Greg Seaby, CNN
updated 11:18 PM EDT, Wed August 28, 2013
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • A bus was carrying members of King family after 'Dream' speech ceremony
  • The bus and a car collided near Washington's Tidal Basin just off the National Mall
  • Reality star Omarosa Manigault said she was on the bus: 'We were very afraid'
  • Mall Police say a person in the car taken to hospital; no report yet on bus passengers

Washington (CNN) -- Family members of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. were involved in a bus accident Wednesday after the high-profile ceremony marking the 50th anniversary of King's "I Have a Dream" speech, police said.

The bus and a car collided near Washington's Tidal Basin just off the National Mall where the ceremony was held, according to Park Police, who have jurisdiction over the Mall.

They said a person in the car was injured and taken to a hospital but did not provide information on injuries to bus passengers.

Members of the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr's family ring a bell on Wednesday, August 28, as President Barack Obama watches, during the Let Freedom Ring Commemoration and Call to Action to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. Members of the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr's family ring a bell on Wednesday, August 28, as President Barack Obama watches, during the Let Freedom Ring Commemoration and Call to Action to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington.
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Several members of the King family were aboard the bus and had laid a wreath at the memorial to the civil rights leader, according to Omarosa Manigault, a reality television star who was aboard the bus.

"We were very afraid," she told CNN. "There were children on the bus, seniors and everything. Everybody was thrown out of their seats."

She said she hit her head in the accident.

Obama: Because they marched, America changed

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