Skip to main content

Japan Fukushima toxic water leak a Level 3 'serious incident'

By Jethro Mullen and Junko Ogura, CNN
updated 9:49 AM EDT, Wed August 28, 2013
 Shunichi Tanaka, chairman of Japan's Nuclear Regulation Authority, speaks at a press conference in Tokyo on Wednesday.
Shunichi Tanaka, chairman of Japan's Nuclear Regulation Authority, speaks at a press conference in Tokyo on Wednesday.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • The alert is Japan's gravest warning since meltdowns at the nuclear plant in 2011
  • The Japanese regulator made the decision after consulting with the IAEA
  • A storage tank at the plant leaked hundreds of tons of toxic water
  • A government minister this week criticized the plant operator's handling of leaks

Tokyo (CNN) -- Japan's nuclear watchdog on Wednesday said a toxic water leak at the tsunami-damaged Fukushima Daiichi power plant has been classified as a level 3 "serious incident" on an international scale.

The Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA) said it had made the decision after consulting with the Vienna-based International Atomic Energy Agency, said Juntaro Yamada, a spokesman for the regulator.

As news emerged last week of the leak of hundreds of tons of radioactive water from a storage tank, the NRA said it was planning to issue the alert, its gravest warning since the massive 2011 earthquake and tsunami that sent three reactors at the plant into meltdown.

The leak had previously been assigned a level 1 "anomaly rating" on the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale, which ranges from zero, for no safety threat, to seven, for a major accident like the meltdowns.

The decision to issue the level 3 alert came two days after a Japanese government minister had compared the plant operator's efforts to deal with worrying toxic water leaks at the site to a game of "whack-a-mole."

How dangerous is Japan's nuclear leak?
Fukushima plant 'house of horrors'
How dangerous is Japan's nuclear leak?

Toshimitsu Motegi, the industry minister, said Monday after visiting the plant that "from now on, the government is going to step forward." His ministry has been tasked by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to come up with measures to tackle the mounting problems at Fukushima Daiichi.

TEPCO looks for outside help to stabilize Fukushima

Huge volumes of toxic water

The plant operator, Tokyo Electric Power Company (Tepco), has been struggling to deal with the high volume of contaminated water at the plant.

Last month, Tepco admitted that radioactive groundwater was leaking into the Pacific Ocean from the site, bypassing an underground barrier built to seal in the water.

About 400 tons of groundwater flow into the site each day, and Tepco also pumps large amounts water through the buildings to keep the crippled reactors cool.

Fukishima tuna study finds miniscule health risks

The operator has stored hundreds of thousands of tons of the contaminated water in huge tanks at the site. There are now about 1,000 of the containers, 93% of which are already full of radioactive water.

Around 350 of the tanks were built as temporary storage units in the aftermath of the meltdowns. But more than two years later, they are still being used.

It was one of those makeshift tanks where the leak was detected, setting off the latest crisis.

Tepco says it has transferred the remaining tainted water from the faulty tank to another container. But it hasn't said what caused the leak in the first place.

Japan ponders freezing ground

CNN's Junko Ogura reported from Tokyo, and Jethro Mullen wrote from Hong Kong.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
updated 3:46 PM EDT, Tue September 2, 2014
ISIS has published a video titled "A second message to America," showing the beheading of American journalist Steven Sotloff.
updated 9:35 PM EDT, Mon September 1, 2014
Three Americans detained in North Korea spoke out about their conditions and pleaded for U.S. help in interviews with CNN.
Hundreds of jihadis in Syria are from abroad -- which countries have the biggest problem?
updated 3:51 PM EDT, Mon September 1, 2014
CNN attends a funeral where mourners keep their distance.
updated 5:13 AM EDT, Mon September 1, 2014
Libyan militia members have apparently turned the abandoned U.S. Embassy in Tripoli, Libya, into a water park.
updated 7:26 AM EDT, Mon September 1, 2014
A few miles south of the town of Starobeshevo in eastern Ukraine, a group of men in uniform is slumped under a tree.
updated 9:25 PM EDT, Mon September 1, 2014
Beijing says only candidates approved by a nominating committee can run for Hong Kong's chief executive, prompting criticism.
updated 4:23 AM EDT, Fri August 29, 2014
He should be toddling around a playground. Instead, his tiny hands grip an AK-47.
updated 8:23 PM EDT, Tue August 26, 2014
Wilson Raj Perumal tells CNN how he rigged World Cup games: "I was giving orders to the coach."
updated 8:21 AM EDT, Tue September 2, 2014
In a major breach of privacy, a hacker leaked a series of pictures allegedly showing Jennifer Lawrence and other female celebrities in the nude.
Instead of weaving garments sold in the West, children should be in school
According to the International Labour Organization, there are 168 million child laborers around the world.
Browse through images from CNN teams around the world that you don't always see on news reports.
ADVERTISEMENT