Skip to main content

After Chernobyl, complexity surrounds local health problems

By Elizabeth Landau, CNN
updated 9:00 AM EDT, Mon August 19, 2013
Laborers work on construction of the Soviet Union's Chernobyl nuclear power plant on July 1, 1975. The Chernobyl accident is the world's worst nuclear accident. The disaster sent a cloud of radioactive fallout over hundreds of thousands of square miles of Russia, Belarus and Ukraine. The radioactive effects of the explosion were about 400 times more potent than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima during World War II. Laborers work on construction of the Soviet Union's Chernobyl nuclear power plant on July 1, 1975. The Chernobyl accident is the world's worst nuclear accident. The disaster sent a cloud of radioactive fallout over hundreds of thousands of square miles of Russia, Belarus and Ukraine. The radioactive effects of the explosion were about 400 times more potent than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima during World War II.
HIDE CAPTION
After the Chernobyl disaster
After the Chernobyl disaster
After the Chernobyl disaster
After the Chernobyl disaster
After the Chernobyl disaster
After the Chernobyl disaster
After the Chernobyl disaster
After the Chernobyl disaster
After the Chernobyl disaster
After the Chernobyl disaster
After the Chernobyl disaster
<<
<
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
>
>>
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • More than 2 million people in Belarus were affected by the Chernobyl disaster
  • About 5 million people in Belarus, Ukraine and Russia received whole-body radiation
  • Several groups provide relief to kids who live in areas that received radioactive fallout
  • It is not possible to say that any particular illness was caused by Chernobyl radiation

(CNN) -- Yulia Gorelik describes her 8-year-old son, Daniel, as "a very clever boy." He plays "Fur Elise" with elegant ease on the piano and enjoys eating McDonald's chicken nuggets.

Mother and son arrived in the United States this summer through an organization called Hope for Chernobyl's Child. Gorelik had faith that American doctors could fix Daniel's headaches, weakness and vertigo during their six-week stay.

"I have the hope that we can do something here to make him stronger, because he is intelligent, he is nice, but his body is weak," Gorelik, 34, said in July.

From left, Yulia Gorelik, Daniel Gorelik and Maksim Adzinochanka, with Phillip and Jennifer Henning behind.
From left, Yulia Gorelik, Daniel Gorelik and Maksim Adzinochanka, with Phillip and Jennifer Henning behind.

The Goreliks live in a region called Gomel, Belarus, which was heavily hit with radioactive fallout from the worst nuclear accident the world has ever seen.

On April 26, 1986, explosions at a reactor at Chernobyl in Ukraine produced radiation effects almost 14 times greater than the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi disaster in Japan and 400 times more powerful than the 1945 atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima.

More than 2 million people in Belarus were affected by the Chernobyl disaster, according to the World Bank. Two-thirds of the contamination from the accident fell in Belarus, diminishing the quality of life in the region.

Hope for Chernobyl's Child helps 10 to 15 children living in Belarus find host families and dental and medical care in Washington state every summer. The organization also helps families on the ground in Belarus by delivering humanitarian aid.

A Tokyo Electric Power Co. worker describes the situation a year after the disaster at Fukushima to journalists on February 28. A Tokyo Electric Power Co. worker describes the situation a year after the disaster at Fukushima to journalists on February 28.
Fukushima, one year later
HIDE CAPTION
<<
<
1
2
3
4
5
>
>>
Fukushima, one year later Fukushima, one year later
Deadly train derailment: At least 38 people were killed and 37 are still missing in the small town of Lac Megantic, Quebec, where a runaway train exploded in the downtown district on Saturday, July 6. Police suspect that some of the victims were vaporized in the explosion. Look back at some of the worst industrial disasters in modern history: Deadly train derailment: At least 38 people were killed and 37 are still missing in the small town of Lac Megantic, Quebec, where a runaway train exploded in the downtown district on Saturday, July 6. Police suspect that some of the victims were vaporized in the explosion. Look back at some of the worst industrial disasters in modern history:
Worst industrial disasters: Canada
HIDE CAPTION
<<
<
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
>
>>
Photos: Industrial disasters through history Photos: Industrial disasters through history

Medical and dental care are lacking in areas affected by the disaster, Hope for Chernobyl's Child says. Families there often earn little money and have limited job opportunities, making it difficult to provide food, clothing and medications for their children.

Ask Gorelik whether her son's health problems are caused by radiation, and she says, "Yes, of course."

But the reality is much more complex.

Chernobyl tourists see relics among the radiation

What does radiation really cause?

People who lived in the areas that received significant contamination from Chernobyl in 1986 have been the subject of many scientific studies. But researchers haven't looked much at health problems in the region's children who weren't yet born at the time of the disaster, said Scott Davis, epidemiologist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center at the University of Washington.

The lack of hard evidence doesn't mean that lingering radiation isn't causing harm in some ways, Davis said, but it would be difficult to establish that anyone's particular disease or condition stems from low-dose radiation exposure over a long period in that area.

"This is a major problem in talking with people who, either themselves or someone close to them, (are) sick," he said. "To say, 'Well, we don't see any risk' -- people just can't get their head around that."

The issue is complicated because cancer, for example, caused by radiation looks exactly like cancer that developed for other reasons, experts say. There's no "Chernobyl" name tag on tumors in people who suffered radiation exposure.

Scientists know radioactive iodine-131 got into the human body when people drank milk from cows that ate contaminated grass, said Dr. Fred Mettler, professor emeritus of the Department of Radiology at the University of New Mexico. This led to higher incidences of thyroid cancer in people who were children at that time -- such as Yulia Gorelik, who underwent treatment at age 12.

More than 4,000 such cases were diagnosed from 1992 to 2002, but it's impossible to say which ones were caused by Chernobyl radiation. Mettler said the iodine is unlikely to have caused cancer in anyone born later -- especially because iodine-131 has a half-life of eight days, so in about two months, it's almost undetectable.

Another radioactive chemical from the reactor explosion, Cesium-137, has a half-life of about 30 years, so it stays around a lot longer than iodine-131 and can still be measured in some soils and foods in several areas of Europe. Still, the dose to which people in the area have been exposed isn't very high, Mettler said.

The doses from cesium contamination "are low and insufficient to cause effects, had there been any," said John Boice, professor of medicine at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and president nominee of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements.

"A lot of the issues become: Are the health things really due to Chernobyl, or are they things which would have occurred anyhow?" Mettler said.

Photos: 'The city Chernobyl built'

Zones of uncertainty

For Jennifer Henning, president of Hope for Chernobyl's Child, there's no question that the ailments the children in the program suffer are the result of radiation exposure.

Tell us your story!
We love to hear from our audience. Follow @CNNHealth on Twitter and Facebook for the latest health news and let us know what we're missing.

"I've seen the health effects firsthand," Henning said. "I know that it's there."

A physical education teacher in one of the schools that the organization works with told her that children there are getting weaker and weaker, Henning said.

That there are serious health problems among many youths in Belarus is not in dispute.

In 2008, nearly 22% of adolescents in Belarus had chronic diseases and disabilities, according to a 2010 UNICEF report. Risk factors, according to this report, included smoking and using alcohol and drugs.

Experts say that what organizations such as Hope for Chenobyl's Child are doing to help children with medical problems -- providing assistance in Belarus and flying them to the United States for medical respite -- is great. Several other organizations also operate in regions devastated by the Chernobyl accident, such as Chernobyl Children International, the Chernobyl Children's Project and Chernobyl Children's Trust.

But rather than radiation-related illness, according to the 2005 Chernobyl Forum report, "The most pressing health concerns for the affected areas thus lie in poor diet and lifestyle factors such as alcohol and tobacco use, as well as poverty and limited access to health care."

The cause of Chernobyl evokes greater sympathy from the public than some other causes might, Mettler said.

"It's a very unique, scary accident," he said. "Everybody in the world knows about it. But, if you were to say, 'I've got children starving in the Sudan,' people would go, 'huh, whatever.' It wouldn't get their attention."

Henning points to a 2009 report, published by the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, rounding up evidence that radiation has had a lasting effect on the health of the population in contaminated areas. In Belarus, for instance, cancer morbidity increased 40% from 1990 to 2000, the report said, and girls age 10 to 14 born to irradiated parents had an increase in malignant and benign neoplasms.

Mettler counters this with the Chernobyl Forum report and a report from the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, which both had stamps of approval from representatives of the governments of Russia, Belarus and the Ukraine.

The Chernobyl Forum report said that while increases in congenital malformations in children have been reported in Belarus since 1986, the rates are not related to radiation and "may be the result of increased registration" -- i.e. more people reporting their family's health problems.

"The majority of the 'contaminated' territories are now safe for settlement and economic activity," although certain restrictions need to remain in place on the use of land in some areas, the report said.

More than 5 million people in Belarus, Russia and Ukraine living in "contaminated" areas received whole-body radiation from the accident, but in doses not much higher than the natural radiation in the environment, the report said.

Does that mean that a healthy person could safely move to an area that has been cordoned off for decades and not have an increased risk of cancer? Davis isn't so sure -- but said he believes it hasn't been studied extensively enough.

"Common sense would dictate that it's probably not a great idea to live in a highly contaminated area and eat produce produced in the fields that are contaminated, or be in constant exposure mode," Davis said.

Chernobyl: Environmental dead zone or eco-haven?

A mental toll

Both international reports highlighted the mental health toll as well; the Chernobyl Forum report called this the greatest public health problem that the accident caused. More than 330,000 people were relocated from the hardest-hit areas, which was a "deeply traumatic experience" for many.

"There is no question that people who either are exposed to radiation or think they might have been, suddenly are very nervous, and every time something happens, they go, 'Oh, my God, what is this? Do I have a problem?' And they dash off to the hospital," Mettler said.

Studies have shown that this population has a higher level of anxiety and are more likely to report that they have physical symptoms that they cannot explain, according to the Chernobyl Forum report. They're also more likely to say they are in poor health.

The report noted that as the media began to speak of "Chernobyl victims" and governments offered disaster-related benefits, "rather than perceiving themselves as 'survivors,' many of those people have come to think of themselves as helpless, weak and lacking control over their future."

Gorelik was not evacuated after Chernobyl. She grew up in the region of Gomel, the same area where she and Daniel live today. About a 20-minute drive away is the "Dead Zone," where entire villages have been abandoned since 1986.

Getting medical care

Gorelik and Daniel stayed with Henning's family in the Seattle area during part of the summer. They returned to Belarus at the beginning of August, Henning said. During their time in the Pacific Northwest, they saw the ocean, mountains and a rainforest, in addition to various doctors. Daniel put on 4.5 pounds during the six-week stay.

"Yulia and Daniel saw various doctors and it was determined that many of their health issues could be attributed to the poor nutrition that is so common in this area of Belarus," Henning said in an e-mail.

Among the nine children and two adults, including Gorelik, who spent this summer in the United States through Hope for Chernobyl's Child, a total of 47 cavities were filled, four wisdom teeth were pulled, and 60 blood tests were taken, Henning said. The Belarusians gained a combined total of 26.5 pounds.

Gorelik said in July that Hope for Chernobyl's Child has given her not only material help but also mental support. The gratitude she feels toward the organization and her hosts is immeasurable, she says.

Reflecting on her situation, her words about lack of control are reminiscent of the Chernobyl Forum Report: "If you are living in bad conditions, sometimes, you feel like you are alone. You don't have control of your life. You don't have any support. You don't have any hope, maybe. There is only one hope, to God. But if you meet some people who can give you their hands, and their help, it is making you stronger, it is making you happy, really happy. That's why I'm grateful with all my soul."

Gorelik and Daniel left for their long journey back to Belarus on August 5, including a 13-hour layover in Frankfurt. Henning and colleagues arranged for them, and the others in the Hope for Chernobyl's Child group, to rest in a lounge at the airport.

Such cross-cultural friendship has become part of the fallout of Chernobyl.

26 years on: Helping Chernobyl's children

Follow Elizabeth Landau on Twitter and Google+

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
Science news
updated 7:52 AM EDT, Tue July 22, 2014
The world's largest flying aquatic insect, with huge, nightmarish pincers, has been discovered in China's Sichuan province.
updated 8:10 AM EDT, Mon June 23, 2014
As fans of "Grey's Anatomy," "ER" and any other hospital-based show can tell you, emergency-room doctors are fighting against time.
updated 7:59 AM EDT, Thu May 29, 2014
Ask 100 robotics scientists why they're inspired to create modern-day automatons and you may get 100 different answers.
updated 12:35 PM EDT, Fri June 13, 2014
From the air, the Namibian desert looks like it has a bad case of chicken pox.
updated 12:43 PM EDT, Wed May 28, 2014
The trend for nature-inspired designs has spread across industries from crab-style deep-sea vessels to insect-inspired buildings.
updated 8:22 AM EDT, Sun May 25, 2014
Consider it the taxonomist's equivalent of a People magazine's Most Beautiful List.
updated 11:32 AM EDT, Fri May 9, 2014
For the first time, scientists have shown it is possible to alter the biological alphabet and still have a living organism that passes on the genetic information.
updated 7:48 AM EDT, Mon May 5, 2014
Do we really want to go the route of "Jurassic Park"?
updated 8:44 AM EDT, Fri May 2, 2014
Catch a train from the sky! Perhaps in the future, the high-rise superstructures could help revolutionize the way we travel.
updated 10:58 AM EDT, Mon May 5, 2014
In a nondescript hotel ballroom last month at the South by Southwest Interactive festival, Andras Forgacs offered a rare glimpse at the sci-fi future of food.
updated 10:12 AM EDT, Thu March 20, 2014
For a Tyrannosaurus rex looking for a snack, nothing might have tasted quite like the "chicken from hell."
updated 6:29 PM EDT, Fri March 14, 2014
Everyone is familiar with Tyrannosaurus rex, but humanity is only now meeting its much smaller Arctic cousin.
updated 12:12 PM EST, Thu March 6, 2014
At about 33 feet long, weighing 4 to 5 tons and baring large blade-shaped teeth, the dinosaur Torvosaurus gurneyi was a formidable creature.
updated 6:43 AM EST, Fri February 21, 2014
This Pachyrhinosaurus can go to the head of its class.
updated 8:04 AM EDT, Thu March 27, 2014
Science is still trying to work out how exactly we reason through moral problems, and how we judge others on the morality of their actions. But patterns are emerging.
updated 7:06 PM EST, Thu February 27, 2014
A promising way to stop a deadly disease, or an uncomfortable step toward what one leading ethicist called eugenics?
updated 8:07 PM EST, Fri February 14, 2014
Seattle paleontologists safely removed the largest fossilized mammoth tusk discovered in the region from a construction site.
updated 6:13 AM EDT, Tue April 23, 2013
A mysterious, circular structure, with a diameter greater than the length of a Boeing 747 jet, has been discovered submerged about 30 feet underneath the Sea of Galilee in Israel.
updated 5:25 PM EST, Fri January 17, 2014
Every corner of the planet offers some sort of natural peculiarity with an explanation that makes us wish we'd studied harder in junior high Earth science class.
updated 8:20 AM EST, Thu November 14, 2013
Deep in a remote, hot, dry patch of northwestern Australia lies one of the earliest detectable signs of life on the planet, tracing back nearly 3.5 billion years, scientists say.
updated 3:10 PM EDT, Wed September 4, 2013
We leave genetic traces of ourselves wherever we go -- in a strand of hair left on the subway or in saliva on the side of a glass at a cafe.
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT