Skip to main content

Which Jeff Bezos bought the Washington Post?

By Dan Sinker, Special to CNN
updated 7:44 AM EDT, Wed August 7, 2013
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Amazon.com's Jeff Bezos bought the Washington Post for $250 million
  • Dan Sinker: I hope it was the Bezos who shepherded Amazon Web Services into being
  • He says with AWS, a transformative technology, Bezos embraced experiments
  • Sinker: Leadership that allows journalists to invent and experiment is what we need

Editor's note: Dan Sinker is director of Knight-Mozilla OpenNews, which is helping build the community around open-source programming in journalism. Follow him on Twitter: @dansinker

(CNN) -- Which Jeff Bezos bought the Washington Post for $250 million?

Was it the Bezos who helped recover two Apollo-era F-1 engines from the bottom of the Atlantic ocean this spring? A savior capable of raising rusted heaps out of their watery graves?

Was it the Bezos who's sunk $42 million into the "Clock of the Long Now," a timepiece that will run for 10,000 years entombed inside a man-made cavern carved into the top of a mountain outside of Ely, Nevada? An eccentric billionaire who'll drop vast amounts of money into, well, a hole in the ground?

Was it the Bezos who founded Amazon, the biggest store in the world, a company that has both transformed and trampled nearly every formerly brick-and-mortar industry it has entered, from books to shoes and beyond?

Dan Sinker
Dan Sinker

Or was it the Bezos whose personal investments -- in companies like Twitter, Airbnb, Makerbot, Uber and many others -- demonstrate an innate understanding of the shifting trends of the web?

Each one of those Jeff Bezoses would do interesting things to the Washington Post (well, maybe not the crazy mountain clock guy).

But as someone who spends every day thinking about the intersection of journalism and technology, I hope it was the Jeff Bezos who shepherded AWS -- Amazon Web Services -- into being.

Unless you build things on the Internet, you've probably never heard of AWS. That's because AWS is in one of the world's least sexy businesses: server and computational infrastructure.

AWS began as a commerce problem. Amazon needed a massive server cloud for the holiday shopping season but only a fraction of it for the rest of the year. That means a lot of expensive servers would be sitting idle to make sure your Christmas presents don't get hung up when you press "purchase." So the idea hatched that those idle computer servers could be rented out to other companies. It worked.

The Washington Post Company announced on Monday, August 5, that it was selling its newspaper business to Amazon.com founder Jeff Bezos for $250 million. Bezos says he understands "the critical role the Post plays in Washington, D.C., and our nation." Take a look at a brief history of a newspaper that inspired a generation of journalists. The Washington Post Company announced on Monday, August 5, that it was selling its newspaper business to Amazon.com founder Jeff Bezos for $250 million. Bezos says he understands "the critical role the Post plays in Washington, D.C., and our nation." Take a look at a brief history of a newspaper that inspired a generation of journalists.
History of the Washington Post
HIDE CAPTION
<<
<
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
>
>>
Photos: History of the Washington Post Photos: History of the Washington Post
Bezos: 'Path ahead will not be easy'
Bernstein: Bezos could be great for Post

Now, when you watch a movie streamed from Netflix, you're using AWS. When you check out your friend's picture on Instagram, read a blog on Tumblr, pin something on Pinterest, you're accessing AWS. Reddit, the "front page of the Internet"? That's built on AWS. The infrastructure of the Obama for America re-election campaign -- vaunted as the most technically sophisticated campaign in history -- relied on AWS, too. The size, scale and impact of the AWS server cloud is massive and growing.

AWS is one of the most transformative and oft-overlooked technologies of the last decade. And it started as little more than a "hare-brained scheme," as Benjamin Black, one of the original drafters of the technology, described it in 2009. AWS is about as "all of the buffalo" as you get in technology: Use every part of the tech stack so that your servers are always in use, either by you or by others.

With AWS, Bezos found value in every part of the process. He looked at risks and embraced "hare-brained" experiments. He saw opportunity in extending Amazon technology externally, not just keeping it all in-house (AWS serves the streaming movies of Amazon's competitor Netflix just as efficiently as it serves its own).

Similar to the creation of AWS, journalism has its done its share of invention and experiments that have transformed the Web.

Django, a Web framework used by companies like Pinterest and Instagram, got its start in the newsroom of the Lawrence Journal-World. Backbone, a Javascript library that powers sites like Hulu and Pandora, was created as part of the Document Cloud project at the New York Times. These newsroom technologies and others like them are transformational not just to journalism but to the entire Web the same way AWS doesn't power only Amazon.

These spinoffs, these "hare-brained" ideas, these bits and pieces of code that start in the newsroom and end transforming the Web itself, are what technologists in journalism do best when they have the right support and leadership behind them. That leadership is still too rare in the journalism industry. That may have changed in a big way on Monday.

In a letter written to Washington Post employees, Bezos says that, moving forward, "we will need to invent, which means we will need to experiment."

Let's do it.

Follow us on Twitter @CNNOpinion.

Join us on Facebook/CNNOpinion.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Dan Sinker.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
updated 11:39 AM EDT, Thu October 30, 2014
Mike Downey says the Giants and the Royals both lived through long title droughts. What teams are waiting for a win?
updated 2:32 PM EDT, Thu October 30, 2014
Mel Robbins says if a man wants to talk to a woman on the street, he should follow 3 basic rules.
updated 5:03 PM EDT, Wed October 29, 2014
Peter Bergen and David Sterman say more terrorism plots are disrupted by families than by NSA surveillance.
updated 5:25 PM EDT, Wed October 29, 2014
Time magazine has clearly kicked up a hornet's nest with its downright insulting cover headlined "Rotten Apples," says Donna Brazile.
updated 4:55 PM EDT, Wed October 29, 2014
Leroy Chiao says the failure of the launch is painful but won't stop the trend toward commercializing space.
updated 7:45 AM EDT, Wed October 29, 2014
Timothy Stanley: Though Jeb Bush has something to offer, another Bush-Clinton race would be a step backward.
updated 8:37 AM EDT, Tue October 28, 2014
Errol Louis says forced to choose between narrow political advantage and the public good, the governors showed they are willing to take the easy way out over Ebola.
updated 2:03 PM EDT, Mon October 27, 2014
Eric Liu says with our family and friends and neighbors, each one of us must decide what kind of civilization we expect in the United States. It's our responsibility to set tone and standards, with our laws and norms
updated 7:45 AM EDT, Mon October 27, 2014
Sally Kohn says the UNC report highlights how some colleges exploit student athletes while offering little in return
updated 3:04 PM EDT, Sun October 26, 2014
Terrorists don't represent Islam, but Muslims must step up efforts to counter some of the bigotry within the world of Islam, says Fareed Zakaria
updated 9:02 AM EDT, Fri October 24, 2014
Scott Yates says extending Daylight Saving Time could save energy, reduce heart attacks and get you more sleep
updated 8:32 PM EDT, Sun October 26, 2014
Reza Aslan says the interplay between beliefs and actions is a lot more complicated than critics of Islam portray
updated 7:19 AM EDT, Mon October 27, 2014
Julian Zelizer says control of the Senate will be decided by a few close contests
updated 8:12 AM EDT, Fri October 24, 2014
The response of some U.S. institutions that should know better to Ebola has been anything but inspiring, writes Idris Ayodeji Bello.
updated 9:12 AM EDT, Tue October 21, 2014
Sigrid Fry-Revere says the National Organ Transplant Act has caused more Americans to die waiting for an organ than died in both World Wars, Korea, Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT