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Quake rattles New Zealand, but no deaths reported

From Matt Smith and Mitra Mobasherat, CNN
updated 11:03 PM EDT, Sun July 21, 2013
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • NEW: "We have had very few injuries ... and we want to keep it that way," mayor says
  • Sunday's quake struck about 35 miles (57 kilometers) south of New Zealand's capital
  • The quake followed a series of tremors in recent days
  • The U.S. Geological Survey rated the quake a magnitude 6.5

(CNN) -- New Zealand's capital was cleaning up Monday after a strong earthquake that shook the city and left authorities scrambling to make sure buildings were safe.

The quake struck about 35 miles (57 kilometers) south of Wellington in the channel between New Zealand's northern and southern islands. Initially reported as a magnitude-6.9 quake, the U.S. Geological Survey later reclassified its magnitude as 6.5, at a depth of 14 km (8.7 miles).

No fatalities or serious injuries were reported, but Wellington Mayor Celia Wade-Brown warned residents to be careful and "expect disruption" as the work week began. Bus service was running, but rush-hour commuter trains were idled as rail crews looked for damage.

Measuring the magnitude of earthquakes

People who work in the central city were advised not to come in, while all workers were told to check with their employers before entering the city.

"We have had very few injuries as a result of the earthquake, and we want to keep it that way," Wade-Brown said in a Monday statement.

Perched on the edge of the southern Pacific rim, New Zealand has a long history of earthquakes. A February 2011 quake in the South Island city of Christchurch killed 185 people, most of whom died in building collapses.

Sunday's quake was the latest in a series of tremors that have jolted New Zealand's Lower North Island in the past few days.

Quake hits central China

CNN's Phil O'Sullivan contributed to this report.

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