Skip to main content

Why you should be afraid of Lyme disease

By Pamela Weintraub, Special to CNN
updated 12:47 PM EDT, Mon July 29, 2013
 Lyme is the most frequently reported tick-borne disease in the United States, but only a fraction of cases are reported.
Lyme is the most frequently reported tick-borne disease in the United States, but only a fraction of cases are reported.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Pamela Weintraub: Her family went through nightmare in grappling with Lyme disease
  • Weintraub: Deep divisions in the medical community hinder real solution on the disease
  • She says it is unclear if Lyme agent stays in patients' bodies even after treatment
  • Weintraub: Scientists need to stop fighting, listen to patients and conduct new studies

Editor's note: Pamela Weintraub is the author of "Cure Unknown: Inside the Lyme Epidemic" (St. Martin's Press), winner of the 2009 American Medical Writers Association book award, and executive editor of Discover magazine. Follow her on Twitter: @pam3001

(CNN) -- Our nightmare began in 1993 after we moved from the city to a house down a winding country road abutting a spruce forest in Chappaqua, New York. Our little woods were home to mice, deer and ticks harboring the infectious agent of Lyme disease.

We weren't especially concerned. As seasoned science journalists, my husband and I had researched the risk of tick-borne disease by reading medical journals, finding a raft of articles on a wave of "Lyme hysteria" sweeping the Northeast suburbs; the disease, some of the authors said, was mild and benign. Perhaps that's why, as one of our sons and then the other got sick, our pediatrician resisted testing for Lyme disease.

When my older son, Jason, 14, developed a mottled rash spreading over his torso in 1998, our doctor's office told us that because it wasn't a literal bull's eye -- believed to be the classic indication of Lyme -- it couldn't be Lyme (a misconception still common today despite voluminous research to the contrary).

Pamela Weintraub
Pamela Weintraub

By 2000, Jason suffered aversion to light, profound fatigue and shooting pain throughout his arms and legs. Mostly to placate me, our pediatrician finally ordered a Lyme disease test. It came back positive.

But our doctor still rejected Lyme disease as the cause, instead proposing a psychiatric disorder. The university-based psychiatrist we then consulted called the pediatrician a quack. Our older son, he said, was physically ill.

My family would spend the next decade struggling to get well. Along the way, we had to navigate one of the most vitriolic fights in medicine. As the scientific community fought over the very nature of Lyme disease, debating everything from who actually had it to what treatment worked best, misdiagnosed patients were left to wander the medical outback without a compass or any clear path back to health.

Caused by the spirochete--a coiled bacterium such as the one that causes syphilis-- Borrelia burgdorferi, Lyme is the most frequently reported tick-borne disease in the United States. In 2011, some 33,000 cases met the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's definition. But there are far more patients with the infection since only a fraction of cases are reported.

When doctors attuned to the CDC's rigorous definition resist diagnosing any but the most classic patients -- those with an obvious Lyme rash or highly positive test -- it means patients are left to advance to later, harder-to-treat stages of the disease.

Adding to the mess, physicians frequently fail to test for other, often-debilitating infections from the same black-legged ticks: Babesia, the cause of a malaria-like illness; Anaplasma, an intracellular bacterium; and another spirochete, Borrelia miyamotoi, recently documented as the cause of a relapsing-remitting Lyme-like disease.

In fact, there is a lot of confusion over what may or may not be causing Lyme and other tick-borne diseases around the United States.

In California, scientists have found several new spirochetes yet to be vetted as sources of Lyme-like illness, and researchers in Florida just isolated Lyme spirochetes from ticks despite CDC's website saying not to worry.

Then there's the smackdown over chronic Lyme: Do Lyme patients stay sick following treatment because the infection is still there?

In the 1990s, the National Institutes of Health sought to answer the question by funding a series of studies, the first of which has informed the treatment guidelines published by the Infectious Diseases Society of America ever since. That study monitored 136 Lyme patients who remained chronically ill after antibiotic therapy. In other words, they still showed symptoms of the illness. And yet some 700 blood and spinal fluid samples taken from them yielded no hint of the spirochete.

On one side, experts embraced this small study as proof that chronic Lyme was a myth. They believed the sickness had to be caused by something else since patients showed no sign of the spirochete.

But patients and their doctors were unconvinced. Spirochetes leave body fluids for tissue early in the course of disease, after all, explaining lack of evidence in blood. And researchers had reported persistent spirochetes in the tissue of treated mammals for years.

To resolve the mystery, the NIH commissioned similar experiments with rhesus monkeys. Instead of searching monkey blood for DNA after antibiotic treatment, the researchers would sacrifice the animals and scour their tissue for signs of the Lyme spirochete, including the RNA that is a surer sign of active disease. The monkey studies, published in 2012 by scientists at Tulane, document the presence of Borrelia burgdorferi DNA and RNA following aggressive antibiotic treatment. When uninfected ticks fed on those treated monkeys, they literally ingested intact spirochetes -- proof that the organism remained.

Are small numbers of living spirochetes driving persistent symptoms? Scientific resolution has yet to come, but even the NIH has seen fit to ask the question, launching an ongoing study that tests the ability of treated patients to transmit living Lyme spirochetes to biting ticks.

Despite so many unknowns, continued insistence that Lyme patients are mentally ill has been a drumbeat in our Lymelands, creating a stigma that hampers treatment or the chance of getting well. What we need here, the Institute of Medicine has suggested, is a "process of conflict resolution" to create "a new environment of trust." Progress in research can only happen if the key stakeholders -- the patients -- are included in the work.

Some groups have tried: In June, the National Institute of Standards and Technology held a meeting to help develop better tests. This is a crucial endeavor since standard tests based on legacy technology pick up real patients between just 45% and 75% of the time, especially in the early phase of the disease. Patients and scientists worked together on the NIST event, but collaboration has often been difficult if not impossible to achieve. For instance, a group of scientists has lobbied against federal legislation to increase funding for Lyme disease research. Why? That's just counterproductive.

Powerful 21st-century technologies can help us, but first we've got to admit that waters are muddy and urgent questions remain. Calling patients "Lyme-loonies" or "part of an anti-science movement that denies both the viral cause of AIDS and the benefits of vaccines," is hurtful and untrue. After all, questioning the value of research that keeps one locked in illness is hardly on par with denying HIV. The real science deniers are those circling the wagons around outdated studies, leaving patients desperate and sick while protecting their academic turf.

Follow us on Twitter @CNNOpinion.

Join us on Facebook/CNNOpinion.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Pamela Weintraub.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
updated 3:41 PM EDT, Wed July 30, 2014
Stuart Gitlow says pot is addictive and those who smoke it can experience long-term psychiatric disease.
updated 12:45 PM EDT, Wed July 30, 2014
Gabby Giffords and Katie Ray-Jones say "Between 2001 and 2012, more women were shot to death by an intimate partner in our country than the total number of American troops killed in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars combined."
updated 7:57 PM EDT, Tue July 29, 2014
Alan Elsner says Secretary Kerry's early cease-fire draft was leaked and presented as a final document, which served the interests of hard-liners on both sides who don't want the Gaza war to stop.
updated 7:58 AM EDT, Wed July 30, 2014
Vijay Das says Medicare is a success story that could provide health care for everybody, not just seniors
updated 2:18 PM EDT, Wed July 30, 2014
Rick Francona says Israel seems determined to render Hamas militarily ineffective.
updated 1:43 PM EDT, Wed July 30, 2014
S.E. Cupp says the entrepreneur and Dallas Mavericks owner thinks for himself and refuses to be confined to an ideological box.
updated 9:11 AM EDT, Wed July 30, 2014
A Christian group's anger over the trailer for "Black Jesus," an upcoming TV show, seems out of place, Jay Parini says
updated 4:28 PM EDT, Wed July 30, 2014
LZ Granderson says the cyber-standing ovation given to Robyn Lawley, an Australian plus-size model who posted unretouched photos, shows how crazy Americans' notions of beauty have become
updated 3:39 PM EDT, Wed July 30, 2014
Carol Dweck and Rachel Simmons: Girls tend to have a "fixed mindset" but they should have a "growth mindset."
updated 7:56 AM EDT, Mon July 28, 2014
A crisis like the Gaza conflict or the surge of immigrants can be an opportunity for a lame duck president, writes Julian Zelizer
updated 2:22 PM EDT, Sat July 26, 2014
Carol Costello says the league's light punishment sent the message that it didn't consider domestic violence a serious offense
updated 8:51 AM EDT, Mon July 28, 2014
Danny Cevallos says saggy pants aren't the kind of fashion statement protected by the First Amendment.
updated 2:52 PM EDT, Mon July 28, 2014
Margaret Hoover says some GOP legislators support a state's right to allow same-sex marriage and the right of churches, synagogues and mosques not to perform the sacrament
updated 2:31 PM EDT, Mon July 28, 2014
Megan McCracken and Jennifer Moreno say it's unacceptable for states to experiment with new execution procedures without full disclosure
updated 1:44 PM EDT, Wed July 30, 2014
Priya Satia says today's drones for bombardment and surveillance have their roots in the deadly history of Western aerial control of the Middle East that began in World War One
updated 12:35 PM EDT, Mon July 28, 2014
Jeff Yang says it's great to see the comics make an effort at diversifying the halls of justice
updated 11:55 AM EDT, Sat July 26, 2014
Rick Francona says the reported artillery firing from Russian territory is a sign Vladimir Putin has escalated the Ukraine battle
updated 2:22 PM EDT, Sun July 27, 2014
Paul Callan says the fact that appeals delay the death penalty doesn't make it an unconstitutional punishment, as one judge ruled
updated 6:25 PM EDT, Thu July 24, 2014
Pilot Robert Mark says it's been tough for the airline industry after the plane crashes in Ukraine and Taiwan.
updated 11:10 AM EDT, Fri July 25, 2014
Jennifer DeVoe laments efforts to end subsidies that allow working Americans to finally afford health insurance.
updated 11:33 AM EDT, Sat July 26, 2014
Ruti Teitel says assigning a costly and humiliating "collective guilt" to Germany after WWI would end up teaching the global community hard lessons about who to blame for war crimes
updated 8:45 AM EDT, Fri July 25, 2014
John Sutter responds to criticism of his column on the ethics of eating dog.
updated 9:02 AM EDT, Fri July 25, 2014
Frida Ghitis says it's tempting to ignore North Korea's antics as bluster but the cruel regime is dangerous.
updated 2:50 PM EDT, Fri July 25, 2014
To the question "Is Putin evil?" Alexander Motyl says he is evil enough for condemnation by people of good will.
updated 2:03 PM EDT, Thu July 24, 2014
Laurie Garrett: Poor governance, ignorance, hysteria worsen the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone, Guinea, Liberia.
updated 9:49 AM EDT, Thu July 24, 2014
Patrick Cronin and Kelley Sayler say the world is seeing nonstate groups such as Ukraine's rebels wielding more power to do harm than ever before
updated 6:05 PM EDT, Wed July 23, 2014
Ukraine ambassador Olexander Motsyk places blame for the MH17 tragedy squarely at the door of Russia
updated 7:42 AM EDT, Thu July 24, 2014
Mark Kramer says Russia and its proxies have a history of shooting down civilian aircraft, often with few repercussions
updated 2:53 PM EDT, Thu July 24, 2014
Les Abend says, with rockets flying over Tel Aviv and missiles shooting down MH17 over Ukraine, a commercial pilot's pre-flight checklist just got much more complicated
updated 9:17 AM EDT, Thu July 24, 2014
Mark Kramer says Russia and its proxies have a history of shooting down civilian aircraft, often with few repercussions
updated 12:37 PM EDT, Thu July 24, 2014
Gerard Jacobs says grieving families and nations need the comfort of traditional rituals to honor the remains of loved ones, particularly in a mass disaster
updated 10:13 AM EDT, Thu July 24, 2014
The idea is difficult to stomach, but John Sutter writes that eating dog is morally equivalent to eating pig, another intelligent animal. If Americans oppose it, they should question their own eating habits as well.
updated 12:30 PM EDT, Wed July 23, 2014
Bill van Esveld says under the laws of war, civilians who do not join in the fight are always to be protected. An International Criminal Court could rule on whether Israeli airstrikes and Hamas rocketing are war crimes.
updated 8:09 AM EDT, Wed July 30, 2014
Gordon Brown says the kidnapped Nigerian girls have been in captivity for 100 days, but the world has not forgotten them.
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT