Skip to main content

Get ready for Egypt's 'second revolution'

By Cynthia Schneider, Special to CNN
updated 10:54 AM EDT, Tue July 2, 2013
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Cynthia Schneider: Egyptians plan Sunday protest against President Mohamed Morsy
  • Schneider: U.S. ambassador to Egypt ignores history by being skeptical about "street action"
  • Schneider asks: What revolution has succeeded in the short term without taking to the streets?
  • The opposition to Morsy shows that the Egyptian revolution is not over, she says

Editor's note: Cynthia Schneider is a professor in the practice of diplomacy at Georgetown University, dean at the School of Diplomacy at Dubrovnik International University and a senior nonresident fellow at the Brookings Institution. She is also a former U.S. ambassador to the Netherlands.

(CNN) -- Artists tend to occupy the front lines against repression. So it comes as no surprise that the occupation of Egypt's Ministry of Culture protesting the "Brotherhoodization" of the ministry under the leadership of Alaa Abdel-Aziz has helped drive the planned massive demonstrations against Mohamed Morsy on Sunday.

Once again, the U.S. government appears to be on the fence in Egypt, with Ambassador Anne Patterson expressing skepticism about "street action" that could result in violent protests.

"People realize that this is about the identity of Egypt," said Hazem Azmy, a scholar active in the Culture of Ministry occupation.

Cynthia Schneider
Cynthia Schneider

With Ultras (militant soccer fans) standing by to protect the growing crowds, nightly performances are held outside the ministry, ranging from ballet to an impromptu concert by pop star Ahmed Saad that even had the police dancing.

Artists of Cairo's famed Opera House -- on strike since Abdel-Aziz fired its head, Enas Abdel-Dayem -- have been performing, too. Their repertoire? Excerpts from "Zorba the Greek," including scenes of defiance.

Expressing a sentiment increasingly heard in taxis and on the streets of Cairo, the actress Moataza said, "Our protest at the Ministry of Culture is just part and parcel of the struggle of the Egyptians against the colonization of the Muslim Brotherhood." The Brotherhood is as an international organization with loyalty to its members, not to Egypt. She speaks for many, including people who voted for Morsy in the last election.

However, Patterson, the U.S. ambassador, recently equated protests with "violence on the streets" and urged Egyptians to "get organized ... to join or start a political party that reflects your values and aspirations."

Morsy supporters upstage protesters
Morsy: One year later
Jon Stewart brings comedy to Egypt

What revolution has ever succeeded in the short term (and 2½ years is a short term) without taking to the streets? Yes, Egyptians need to become better organized politically, but at this early tumultuous stage, that is a long-term goal.

Patterson's condescending comments ignore history, as well as the specific situation in Egypt. For example, recently a court sentenced employees of nongovernmental organizations to jail, effectively curtailed activities of these groups that provide advice and support for the kind of political activities for which the ambassador advocated.

Patterson's dismissal of "street action" as likely only to "add new names to the lists of martyrs" not only insults the millions of Egyptians who have marched in the streets to change their country for the better, but it also stands at odds with President Barack Obama's words of praise for the Egyptian revolution of 2011: "We stand for universal values, including the rights of the Egyptian people to freedom of assembly, freedom of speech. ..."

What was the Egyptian revolution if not "street action"?

It was left to another U.S. "ambassador" to lend support to Egyptians. On June 21, Jon Stewart appeared on Egyptian satirist Bassem Youssef's popular show, "Al Bernameg," and told the audience: "Bassem is showing that satire ... can carve out a space in a country for people to express themselves. Because that is all democracy is ... the ability to express yourself and be heard."

Ironically, in targeting cultural leaders, including Youssef, the Brotherhood has helped unify its opposition.

For the artists are the canaries in the coal mine, who lead the way in questioning authority and in holding up a mirror to society.

As fate would have it, the sit-ins at the Ministry of Culture and the nightly performances of dance, music and street theater coincided with the growth of the grass-roots Tamarrod movement, which says it has collected more than 15 million signatures in order to force Morsy to call for early elections.

Just as with the 2011 revolution, this "second revolution" began with youth activists, many of them artists, and now has spread like wildfire through the population. Stories abound of traffic stopping in Cairo to accommodate Tamarrod volunteers weaving through cars to gather signatures, often to spontaneous applause.

Reflecting the mood of revolution in the air, Youssef recently hosted an Arabic version of "Les Miserables" on his show. As the studio audience joined the singing group Fabrika in a rousing finale of "Do You Hear the People Sing?" to inspire Egyptians with "the music of the people who will not be slaves again," artists and activists outside continued their vigil for freedom of expression at the Ministry of Culture.

No one knows what will happen Sunday. Feelings of excitement mix with anxiety about the potential for violence, which the recent thug attack on protesters in Alexandria forebodes. But the energy of the young activists behind Tamarrod, the passion of the artists inside and outside the Ministry of Culture, and the unified opposition to Morsy's rule show that the Egyptian revolution is far from over.

"Street action" is the kernel of revolution.

Follow us on Twitter @CNNOpinion.

Join us on Facebook/CNNOpinion.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Cynthia Schneider.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
updated 3:18 PM EDT, Thu April 24, 2014
Frida Ghitis says as violence claims three U.S. doctors, the temptation is to despair, but aid to Afghanistan has made it a much better place
updated 2:33 PM EDT, Thu April 24, 2014
Ruben Navarrette says in California, Asian-Americans are against the use of racial criteria in public colleges.
updated 2:44 PM EDT, Thu April 24, 2014
Heidi Schlumpf says if the Pope did tell an Argentinian woman married to a divorced man that she could take Communion, it may signify a softening of church rules on the divorced and sacraments
updated 12:29 PM EDT, Thu April 24, 2014
Norcross, Georgia, Chief of Police Warren Summers says the new law that allows guns in bars, churches and schools will have unintended dangerous consequences.
updated 1:42 PM EDT, Thu April 24, 2014
Mel Robbins says social media is often ruled by haters, and people can be brutally honest.
updated 12:44 PM EDT, Thu April 24, 2014
Mike Downey says the golf purists can take a hike; the game needs radical changes to win back fans and players.
updated 12:41 PM EDT, Wed April 23, 2014
Robert Hickey says most new housing development is high-end, catering to high-earners.
updated 9:17 AM EDT, Wed April 23, 2014
Alexander Motyl says as Russian President Putin snarled at Ukraine, his foreign minister was signing a conciliatory accord with the West. Whatever the game, the accord is a major stand down by Russia
updated 8:29 AM EDT, Wed April 23, 2014
Les Abend says at every turn, the stowaway teen defied the odds of discovery and survival. What pilot would have thought to look for a person in the wheel well?
updated 7:04 AM EDT, Thu April 24, 2014
Q & A with artist Rachel Sussman on her new book of photographs, "The Oldest Living Things in the World."
updated 3:58 PM EDT, Tue April 22, 2014
Martin Blaser says the overuse of antibiotics threatens to deplete our bodies of "good" microbes, leaving us vulnerable to an unstoppable plague--an "antibiotic winter"
updated 1:37 PM EDT, Tue April 22, 2014
John Sutter asks: Is it possible to eat meat in modern-day America and consider yourself an environmentalist without being a hypocrite?
updated 11:38 AM EDT, Tue April 22, 2014
Sally Kohn notes that Meb Keflezighi rightly was called an American after he won the Boston Marathon, but his status in the U.S. once was questioned
updated 8:56 AM EDT, Tue April 22, 2014
Denis Hayes and Scott Denman say on this Earth Day, the dawn of the Solar Age is already upon us and the Atomic Age of nuclear power is in decline
updated 4:36 PM EDT, Mon April 21, 2014
Retired Coast Guard officer James Loy says a ship captain bears huge responsibility.
updated 1:08 PM EDT, Mon April 21, 2014
Peter Bergen says the latest strikes are part of an aggressive U.S. effort to target militants, including a bomb maker
updated 9:45 AM EDT, Mon April 21, 2014
Cynthia Lummis and Peter Welch say 16 agencies carry out national intelligence, and their budgets are top secret. We need to know how they are spending our money.
updated 8:35 AM EDT, Mon April 21, 2014
Julian Zelizer says President Obama knows more than anyone that he has much at stake in the midterm elections.
updated 8:55 AM EDT, Tue April 22, 2014
Eric Sanderson says if you really want to strike a blow for the environment--and your health--this Earth Day, work to get cars out of cities and create transportation alternatives
updated 10:08 AM EDT, Mon April 21, 2014
Bruce Barcott looks at the dramatic differences in marijuana laws in Colorado and Louisiana
updated 4:47 PM EDT, Fri April 18, 2014
Jim Bell says NASA's latest discovery supports the notion that habitable worlds are probably common in the galaxy.
updated 2:17 PM EDT, Fri April 18, 2014
Jay Parini says even the Gospels skip the actual Resurrection and are sketchy on the appearances that followed.
updated 1:52 PM EDT, Fri April 18, 2014
Graham Allison says if an unchecked and emboldened Russia foments conflict in a nation like Latvia, a NATO member, the West would have to defend it.
updated 9:11 AM EDT, Fri April 18, 2014
John Sutter: Bad news, guys -- the pangolin we adopted is missing.
updated 2:25 PM EDT, Mon April 21, 2014
Ben Wildavsky says we need a better way to determine whether colleges are turning out graduates with superior education and abilities.
updated 6:26 AM EDT, Fri April 18, 2014
Charles Maclin, program manager working on the search and recovery of Malaysia Flight 370, explains how it works.
updated 8:50 AM EDT, Fri April 18, 2014
Jill Koyama says Michael Bloomberg is right to tackle gun violence, but we need to go beyond piecemeal state legislation.
updated 2:45 PM EDT, Thu April 17, 2014
Michael Bloomberg and Shannon Watts say Americans are ready for sensible gun laws, but politicians are cowed by the NRA. Everytown for Gun Safety will prove the NRA is not that powerful.
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT