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Convicted Steubenville teen classified as sex offender

By CNN Staff
updated 8:39 AM EDT, Sat June 15, 2013
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • A judge rules Trent Mays should be classified as a sex offender
  • Mays and Ma'lik Richmond, high school football players, were convicted in March
  • They were convicted of raping a 16-year-old girl last year
  • The case, which involved social media, attracted worldwide attention on social media
Trent Mays must register as a sex offender every six months for the next 20 years, a judge in Ohio has ruled.\n
Trent Mays must register as a sex offender every six months for the next 20 years, a judge in Ohio has ruled.

(CNN) -- An Ohio judge Friday classified as a sex offender one of two Steubenville, Ohio, teenagers convicted of raping a 16-year-old girl last year.

Trent Mays, a former high school football player, must register every six months for 20 years with the sheriff and the county where he resides after he completes his sentence, Judge Thomas Lipps ruled, according to the court's chief probation officer, Fred Abdalla Jr.

In March, Mays, 17, and Ma'lik Richmond, 16, were convicted after being tried as juveniles.

Mays was also found guilty of disseminating a nude photo of a minor. The assault of the girl was partially documented in texts, tweets and pictures posted to the Internet.

Read: Social media's role in the case

Mays was sentenced to a minimum of two years in a juvenile correctional facility. Richmond was sentenced to a minimum of one year, but like Mays, he could be in detention until he is 21.

While Mays' status was the subject of Friday's hearing, no hearing date has been set for Richmond, according to Abdalla.

Read: Teens found guilty

Steubenville victim's mother speaks out
See what he does with passed-out girl

The teens were accused of raping the girl during a series of end-of-summer parties in August 2012.

The case received widespread attention after a blogger who once lived in Steubenville uncovered some materials posted to social media sites.

The blogger wrote about the possibility that the teenagers had been given preferential treatment because they played on the town's highly regarded football team. Police have denied that claim.

Later, the loosely organized hacker group Anonymous got involved, posting a lengthy video in which another teenager -- who has not been charged -- made joking references to the rape.

The ensuing ire over the case brought national attention and criticism to the city from around the country, leaving city officials struggling to defend the community and residents weary of the media spotlight.

Read: The healing process after rape never ends

HLN's Kisa Mlela Santiago contributed to the report.

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