Skip to main content

U.S. Navy adjusts to the times; ditches its ALL CAPS message format

By Ed Payne, CNN
updated 4:45 AM EDT, Thu June 13, 2013
Communications between U.S. Navy ships will no longer be uppercase, the Navy announced.
Communications between U.S. Navy ships will no longer be uppercase, the Navy announced.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • The move will save the Navy more than $20 million a year
  • Using all caps is like shouting in current Internet protocol
  • The Navy has been using all caps since the 1850s

(CNN) -- Well, it seems the U.S. Navy finally got the memo: DON'T USE ALL CAPS! IT'S RUDE!

The Navy is switching to a new messaging system that's cheaper and more efficient.

And oh yeah, one that does away with a century-old practice: communications using all uppercase letters.

"Lowercase messages are here to stay; they provide a more readable format," a Navy news release said, citing James McCarty, the naval messaging program manager at U.S. Fleet Cyber Command.

The all-caps were a vestige of a bygone era.

Back in the 1850s, the teletype machines that the military used were made up of three rows of keys -- none of them lowercase letters.

Word of the change went out to all naval commands in April. But it didn't reach the rest of us until the news release this week.

In it, the Navy said it is ditching its in-house Defense Message System in favor of e-mail. One with a very apt acronym: NICE (Navy Interface for Command Email).

The switch will save the Navy $20 million a year. And it gets them caught up with current Internet protocol.

ALL CAPS READS LIKE YOU'RE BEING SHOUTED AT.

Old sea dogs may feel differently. But they have a couple of months to adjust.

The system won't fully be in place until next year.

Once it is, naval officers will no longer feel like they're being barked at.

Except, of course, in person by their superiors.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
updated 11:35 AM EDT, Tue September 16, 2014
For years, Morten Storm moved between two worlds. A radical Islamist turned double agent is lifting the lid on some of the world's best-kept secrets.
updated 11:34 AM EDT, Tue September 16, 2014
What will happen to Scotland's business (not to mention its currency) if they vote to leave?
updated 8:53 AM EDT, Tue September 16, 2014
The Ebola virus, very deadly and currently without a cure, is fast-spreading throughout the small West African country.
updated 9:24 AM EDT, Tue September 16, 2014
Go to any provincial city in China and you'd be forgiven for thinking the national youth pastimes are online gaming and flirting.
updated 8:53 AM EDT, Wed September 10, 2014
ISIS has captured the minds of a new generation of global jihadists. What does it mean for al Qaeda?
updated 6:32 PM EDT, Mon September 15, 2014
ISIS has slaughtered hundreds. Now nearly 40 nations have agreed to take the fight to the militants. But what can they do?
updated 4:51 AM EDT, Mon September 15, 2014
North Korea calls its human rights a "superior system."
updated 5:29 AM EDT, Tue September 16, 2014
In Wenzhou, called the "Jerusalem of China," authorities have demolished churches.
Are you Muslim? What do you want the world to know about your religion?
updated 10:29 AM EDT, Tue September 16, 2014
A number of Paralympic athletes in Ghana are hoping to use sport to change negative public perceptions.
updated 7:42 AM EDT, Tue September 16, 2014
Each day, CNN brings you an image capturing a moment to remember, defining the present in our changing world.
Browse through images from CNN teams around the world that you don't always see on news reports.
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT