Meet Fuji, the 3-year-old photographer

Story highlights

  • He may be just three, but Onafujiri "Fuji" Remet is already a budding photographer
  • Based in Lagos, Nigeria, he snaps street scenes and captures family portraits
  • Check out the gallery to see some of his images

Meet three-year-old Onafujiri "Fuji" Remet.

While most children his age in Nigeria -- and the rest of the world -- are more concerned with their toys than a career, he has already embarked on his mission to become a professional photographer.

Proud dad Pius Kugbere Remet sent in these images of his talented young son posing with family and at work in Lagos.

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Himself an artist and graphic designer, he says Fuji's inspiration came from the work of his creative family.

Images three, four and eight show the budding photographer at work, snapping street scenes in Lagos and capturing portraits of his older sister, Onarietta (herself a photographer).

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"The creative home environment with unquestioned access to series of cameras is a key factor [in his interest in photography] Pius says.

"I hope he grows up to become a larger than life photographer, who'll explore his natural platform to impact remarkably on the course of humanity."

Read this: Boy's website tracks big beasts

Little Fuji even has an exhibition coming up in Lagos on June 8. Not bad for a three-year-old.

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