Skip to main content

Swedish capital shaken by 3 nights of rioting

By Stephanie Halasz. Per Nyberg and Laura Smith-Spark, CNN
updated 8:30 PM EDT, Wed May 22, 2013
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Three nights of rioting involves youths and police in Sweden's capital, Stockholm
  • Husby, a northern suburb of Stockholm, has been at the center of the disorder
  • Prime Minister Fredrik Reinfeldt appeals for calm in the capital

(CNN) -- Rioting has broken out for the past three nights in Sweden's capital, Stockholm, with scores of cars set alight and violent clashes between police and youths.

The shooting death of a man by police is blamed for the demonstrations.

More than 100 vehicles were set on fire Sunday night just in the northern suburb of Husby, Stockholm police press officer Kjell Lindgren told CNN on Wednesday. Another 29 were set on fire Tuesday night in the wider district, he said.

Eight people were arrested in Husby Tuesday night, which was quieter than the previous two nights, he said.

Husby is an area that has a lot of problems and a high crime rate, according to Lindgren.

The Swedish version of The Local, an English-language online newspaper, quoted a local youth leader as saying some police officers used racial slurs against residents Sunday as the trouble flared.

Tensions have been brewing since May 14, when police shot dead a 69-year-old Husby man who had a machete, the newspaper said.

The disorder led Swedish Prime Minister Fredrik Reinfeldt to issue a statement Tuesday appealing for calm.

"We have had two nights of great worry, damage to property and a threatening mood in Husby. There is a risk that it will continue. Now everyone must help out to calm things down," he said.

"We have groups of young men who believe one should and can change our society through violence. We cannot let violence govern."

Police officers are there to maintain order according to laws that apply to everyone and to keep residents safe, Reinfeldt said.

"We should not make the use of violence a part of freedom of expression," he added.

Reinfeldt said the trouble reflects a broader problem in Swedish society; more should be done to support education and help young people into work, he said.

Sweden is generally regarded as having a history of successful integration of various immigrant groups.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
updated 7:17 PM EDT, Tue July 29, 2014
While aspects of the fighting in Gaza resemble earlier clashes, this time feels different, writes military analyst Rick Francona.
updated 5:29 AM EDT, Wed July 30, 2014
The death of an American from Ebola fuels fears of the further global spread of the virus.
updated 5:10 AM EDT, Wed July 30, 2014
Nearly two weeks after MH17 was blown out of the sky, Dutch investigators have yet to lay eyes on the wreckage. How useful will it be now?
updated 8:56 PM EDT, Tue July 29, 2014
The U.S. and EU are imposing new sanctions on Moscow -- but will they have any effect?
This looks like a ghost ship, but it's actually the site of a tense international standoff between the Philippines and China.
updated 11:55 AM EDT, Sat July 26, 2014
The reported firing of artillery from Russian territory is a sign Vladimir Putin has escalated the Ukraine battle, says CNN's military analyst Rick Francona.
updated 4:46 AM EDT, Sun July 27, 2014
The young boy stops, stares, throws ammunition casings at the reporter's feet without a word.
updated 8:48 PM EDT, Fri July 25, 2014
Sure, Fido is a brown Lab. But inside, he may also be a little green.
updated 9:03 AM EDT, Mon July 28, 2014
Photograph of an undisclosed location by Patrycja Makowska
Patrycja Makowska likes to give enigmatic names to the extraordinarily beautiful photographs she shoots of crumbling palaces.
updated 4:04 AM EDT, Wed July 23, 2014
When the Costa Concordia and its salvage convoy finally depart Giglio, the residents will breathe a sigh of relief -- and shed a tear.
CNN joins the fight to end modern-day slavery by shining a spotlight on its horrors and highlighting success stories.
Browse through images from CNN teams around the world that you don't always see on news reports.
ADVERTISEMENT