Skip to main content

Help tornado victims claim lost photos

(CNN) -- Among the debris scattered hundreds of miles after Monday's devastating Oklahoma tornado are handfuls of personal photos. Some are torn or scratched, others are in remarkably good condition. The people who are finding and posting them on Facebook just want the owners and photographs reunited.

Storm-scattered mementos finding their homes via Facebook

Do you recognize any of the people in these images? Have you found photos you'd like to see returned? Each photo below links back to a Facebook group dedicated to finding the rightful owners. Please share any information you have about these photos on the corresponding Facebook pages.

.

Mobile users unable to see the photos please click here.

If you've found a photo you'd like to submit and you are not a Facebook user, please email Dorrine.Mendoza@turner.com and tell us where you found it.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
Oklahoma City Tornadoes
updated 1:30 PM EDT, Tue May 20, 2014
Max Broderick remembers exactly what he did a year ago Tuesday.
updated 9:58 AM EDT, Mon June 3, 2013
Heavy storms and tornadoes once again ripped through the Midwest. Already devastated areas of Oklahoma were hit again, and this time the damage spread to neighboring states. Here's how you can help.
updated 11:30 AM EDT, Thu May 30, 2013
Families share memories and snapshots of those we lost in the Oklahoma tornado devastation.
updated 1:11 PM EDT, Wed June 5, 2013
The Oklahoma medical examiner's office says 18 people in that state were killed in the storms. The office has released the names of 11.
updated 9:58 AM EDT, Tue June 4, 2013
They chased tornadoes not so much for the thrill, but in the hope that their research might help people avoid the fate to which they succumbed last week.
updated 10:14 AM EDT, Tue June 4, 2013
A menacing tornado churned behind Mike Eilts as the storm chaser's truck sped away.
updated 6:26 AM EDT, Mon May 27, 2013
Why do people in Tornado Alley keep rebuilding and staying in place after storms rip through? People from Moore share their reasons why.
updated 5:07 PM EDT, Mon May 27, 2013
See the best images from the deadly storm.
updated 10:39 AM EDT, Wed May 22, 2013
It's one of the most familiar pieces of advice from authorities to people in the path of a tornado: Get into your basement.
updated 7:55 AM EDT, Thu May 23, 2013
On Sunday, a mystery photograph fluttered from the sky and landed near Leslie Hagelberg's mailbox in West Tulsa, Oklahoma.
The tornado spanned 1.3 miles -- the length of more than 22 football fields lined up end-to-end -- carved a 17-mile path of destruction.
updated 2:31 PM EDT, Wed May 22, 2013
Second-grade teacher Tammy Glasgow walks around what's left of Briarwood Elementary, struggling to pick out of its wreckage the things that once made a school.
updated 9:19 AM EDT, Wed May 22, 2013
It was the end of the school day. The kids at Plaza Towers Elementary School were stuffing their backpacks, looking forward to going home, playing with friends, eating snacks.
updated 11:31 AM EDT, Sun April 27, 2014
The "Tri-State Tornado" killed 695 people and injured 2,027, traveling more than 300 miles.
See the path of the tornado that ripped through Moore, Oklahoma.
ADVERTISEMENT