Bombings in Iraq kill 19 people as worries over sectarian violence grow

Iraqis inspect damages at the site of two car bomb blasts in Tuz Khurmatu in the Salaheddine province, on May 21, 2013.

Story highlights

  • Much of Tuesday's violence was in the northern part of the country
  • One attack involved three bombs at a cattle market
  • In three weeks, 266 people have been killed, according to a CNN tally

At least 19 people were killed and more than 100 were wounded Tuesday in bombings in Iraq, police said.

The latest attacks come amid a recent uptick in Sunni-Shiite violence in Iraq that has killed at least 266 people in the past three weeks, according to a CNN tally. The violence has conjured fears that the all-out sectarian conflict that erupted last decade is starting again.

A suicide bomber wearing an explosive vest in Tarmiya killed three soldiers and wounded seven others in an attack on a checkpoint. Tarmiya is predominantly Sunni.

A car bombing killed five people and wounded 43 others in a Shiite Turkmen neighborhood in Tuz Khurmato. Three roadside bombs at a cattle market in the ethnically mixed city of Kirkuk killed six people and wounded 25 others.

On Tuesday evening, five people at a busy outdoor market on the western outskirts of Baghdad were killed by a car bomb. At least 18 others were wounded. A second attack in the predominantly Sunni neighborhood appeared to target an Army patrol. It wounded three soldiers and three civilians.

Yet another bomb in southern Baghdad injured four people.

These follow a string of attacks Monday that left dozens dead and wounded. Shiites bore the brunt of those attacks.