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Final pieces hoisted atop One World Trade Center

By Erinn Cawthon and Dana Ford, CNN
updated 9:45 AM EDT, Fri May 3, 2013
Ironworkers wait for the final piece of the One World Trade Center spire to be raised into position for attachment to the building in New York on Friday, May 10. The 408-foot spire brings the building to a height of 1,776 feet, making it the tallest in the Western Hemisphere. Ironworkers wait for the final piece of the One World Trade Center spire to be raised into position for attachment to the building in New York on Friday, May 10. The 408-foot spire brings the building to a height of 1,776 feet, making it the tallest in the Western Hemisphere.
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One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
One World Trade Center towers over NYC
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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Construction workers cheer as the pieces are hoisted above their heads
  • "This is like the icing on the cake for New York," says one, WABC reports
  • One World Trade Center will top out at 1,776 feet

New York (CNN) -- As construction workers cheered, the final two pieces of a 408-foot spire were hoisted high above their heads Thursday to the top of One World Trade Center.

Draped with the American flag, the silver spire settled on a temporary platform. Final installation of the pieces will happen later.

"(It's a) beacon that'll be seen for miles around and give a tremendous indication to people around the entire region, and the world, that we're back and we're better than ever," said Steven Plate, director of construction, CNN affiliate WABC reported.

Once the building is complete, it will stand at a height of 1,776 feet -- an allusion to the year of the birth of the nation.

Final parts placed on World Trade Center
CEO: 'Change the name' of One WTC
2012: Time-lapse: New WTC tower

Already the tallest in New York City, One World Trade Center will be the highest building in the Western Hemisphere.

Delivery of the final two sections was delayed by wind and rain, said Anthony Hayes, assistant director of media for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. The crowning pieces were supposed to have been delivered last Monday morning.

Thursday is the second anniversary of the death of Osama bin Laden, the mastermind behind the September 11, 2001, attacks that toppled the original World Trade Center towers.

The spire will contain 18 separate sections of steel and three communication rings. The first -- and heaviest -- steel section was installed in January, weighing more than 67 tons, according to a statement from the Port Authority.

It will serve as an antenna for a television broadcast facility housed in the building.

"This is like the icing on the cake for New York," construction worker Dennis Muia said, WABC reported.

No sign of human remains where latest 9/11 part found

Erinn Cawthon reported from New York; Dana Ford reported and wrote from Atlanta. CNN's Morgan Winsor also contributed to this report.

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