Skip to main content

Court bans Musharraf from Pakistani politics

By CNN Staff
updated 5:41 AM EDT, Wed May 1, 2013
Pervez Musharraf resigned as president of Pakistan in 2008 after nine years in power.
Pervez Musharraf resigned as president of Pakistan in 2008 after nine years in power.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • The ruling by the high court in Peshawar follows similar rulings from lower courts
  • Musharraf, who is accused of wrongdoing in office, can appeal
  • He had been in exile before he returned to Pakistan recently
  • Elections are to be held next month

(CNN) -- A court in Pakistan has banned former President Pervez Musharraf from politics for life.

Tuesday's move -- which can appealed by the controversial figure -- is another barrier in the roadblock Musharraf faces as he tries to get back into his country's political mix.

The ruling by the high court in Peshawar follows similar ruling from lower courts and the Election Commission. Musharraf can pursue an appeal in the Peshawar court or take it to the country's Supreme Court. There was no immediate comment from Musharraf's camp.

National elections are scheduled for next month.

Former President Musharraf in court
Secret drone deal between Pakistan, U.S.

Musharraf resigned as president of Pakistan in 2008 after nine years in power and went into exile the following year, living in London and Dubai. He came back to Pakistan recently under heavy security.

After his return, Musharraf was placed in house arrest by an anti-terrorism court over allegations he illegally ordered the detention of judges in 2007. He denies the charges against him.

The ex-military strongman still has to face two other cases dating from his time in power.

The first relates to claims he did not do enough to protect the life of Benazir Bhutto -- the first woman to be elected prime minister of Pakistan -- before she was assassinated in 2007, weeks before an election in which she hoped to return to office.

Musharraf is also accused of ordering his troops to kill Nawab Akbar Bugti, a popular tribal leader, in the volatile province of Balochistan, in 2006.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
updated 4:01 PM EDT, Mon September 22, 2014
The U.S. has promised to supply and train "acceptable" rebels in Syria to counter ISIS. But who are they and are can the strategy work?
updated 5:16 AM EDT, Mon September 22, 2014
Branded an "extremist" by China's state-run media, Joshua Wong isn't even old enough to drive.
updated 2:55 AM EDT, Mon September 22, 2014
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi surprised political pundits with his rapid rise to power. CNN meets the man behind the enigma.
updated 7:44 AM EDT, Mon September 22, 2014
Liverpool's Italian forward Mario Balotelli reacts during the UEFA Champions League Group B match between Liverpool and Ludogorets Razgrad at the Anfield stadium in Liverpool on September 16, 2014.
British police launched an investigation into abusive tweets sent to Liverpool striker Mario Balotelli.
updated 7:44 PM EDT, Sun September 21, 2014
A woman who was texting her husband before he was killed reflects on the Westgate attack.
updated 6:49 AM EDT, Fri September 19, 2014
British PM David Cameron has had the narrowest of political escapes.
The burial leader. The hospital gatekeeper. The disease detective. All telling powerful, stories from West Africa.
updated 11:54 AM EDT, Mon September 22, 2014
The real secret to a faster commute has been with us all along -- the bus.
updated 9:16 AM EDT, Mon September 22, 2014
13 brands retained their Top 20 status from last year, according to an annual survey.
updated 11:49 AM EDT, Mon September 22, 2014
Think your new tattoo is cool? Look at how our ancestors did it and think again.
updated 7:00 AM EDT, Mon September 22, 2014
Each day, CNN brings you an image capturing a moment to remember, defining the present in our changing world.
Browse through images from CNN teams around the world that you don't always see on news reports.
ADVERTISEMENT