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Lance Armstrong sued by U.S. for post office sponsorship funds

By Terry Frieden, CNN Justice Producer
updated 10:40 AM EDT, Wed April 24, 2013
After denying the allegations for years, cyclist Lance Armstrong admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs. As a result, he was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and an Olympic bronze medal. Click through the gallery for a look at his life and career. After denying the allegations for years, cyclist Lance Armstrong admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs. As a result, he was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and an Olympic bronze medal. Click through the gallery for a look at his life and career.
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Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • USPS paid about $40 million to sponsor Armstrong's cycling team, court document says
  • Justice Department is suing Armstrong, manager, company under False Claims Act
  • Complaint charges the use of prohibited drugs constitutes a breach of contract with USPS

Washington (CNN) -- The Justice Department late Tuesday formally filed its case against Lance Armstrong and his company Tailwind Sports for millions of dollars that the U.S. Postal Service spent to sponsor the cycling team.

"The USPS paid approximately $40 million to sponsor the USPS cycling team from 1998 to 2004," the court document says.

The government said it was intervening to recover triple the amount of the sponsorship funds under the False Claims Act, which could bring a total of more than $100 million in damages.

Armstrong's return to competition sunk

The complaint filed in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia charges that the use of prohibited drugs constitutes a breach of contract with the Postal Service.

Armstrong: Like Bill, people forgive

The government had signaled it would in all likelihood file such an action. The complaint names Armstrong, team manager Johan Bruyneel and Tailwind Sports LLC as defendants. Under the law, the Justice Department faced a 60 day deadline to file its case, which runs out Tuesday night.

Lance Armstrong's demise: How an all-American hero fell to earth

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