What we know about fertilizer plant explosion in Texas

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    Report: Explosion at Texas plant

Report: Explosion at Texas plant 03:01

A massive explosion ripped through a fertilizer plant in the town of West, Texas, Wednesday night, sending scores of injured to area hospitals, sparking fires and triggering evacuations.

WHAT'S NEW

-- "It was like a nuclear bomb went off," West Mayor Tommy Muska said.

-- Some 10 to 15 buildings have been "totally demolished" and "probably 50 homes (were) heavily damaged," said George Smith, community emergency medical services director.

-- The fertilizer plant was near an apartment complex and a nursing home, authorities said.

-- Some people might be trapped in collapsed buildings, Smith said.

    -- "I expect there's going to be many fatalities and many more injured people," he added.

    -- State troopers in gas masks set up roadblocks, waving away cars coming off the highway

    PREVIOUSLY REPORTED

    The blast

    -- A massive explosion hit the West fertilizer plant some 18 miles north of Waco, Texas.

    -- At least two emergency medical personnel are dead, said EMS Director Smith.

    -- Hillcrest Hospital in Waco was told to anticipate 100 injured people.

    -- More than 60 patients were received Wednesday night, hospital CEO Glenn Robinson said, with victims suffering from "blast injuries, orthopedic injuries (and) a lot of lacerations. While some of the injuries are minor, others are "quite serious."

    -- A number of nearby residents were being evacuated because of the possibility of another explosion, officials said.

    -- Chrystal Anthony said she saw the flames engulf a nursing home and an apartment complex.

    The response

    -- A field triage station was set up on a football field near the plant, Robinson said.

    -- At least six helicopters were flying out the injured, Robinson said. Others were being transported by ambulance, and some were getting to the hospital by car, he added.

    -- Aircraft flying below 3,000 feet were banned from going within a 3-mile radius of West, Texas, the Federal Aviation Administration said.

    -- Hazardous material teams were being rushed to the scene, an emergency management official said.

    -- Texas Gov. Rick Perry was working to get resources into the area, his spokesman said.

    -- Anhydrous ammonia is a concern of those in the vicinity of the explosion,Smith said. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, anhydrous ammonia is a pungent gas with suffocating fumes that is used as a fertilizer.

    -- Area residents told CNN that they were warned about the toxic substance.