Skip to main content

Hong Kong dock strike cripples world's third busiest port

By Georgia McCafferty and Esther Pang, CNN
updated 12:36 AM EDT, Thu April 4, 2013
Dockers sit in front of a ship at the Kwai Chung container terminal in Hong Kong on March 29.
Dockers sit in front of a ship at the Kwai Chung container terminal in Hong Kong on March 29.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Dock workers in Hong Kong are striking for the seventh day, crippling port operations
  • About 500 workers outside the world's third largest port are demanding a 15% pay increase
  • Hong Kong International Terminals is estimating berthing delays of up to 60 hours
  • Strikers attract groundswell of support from pro-democracy parties and students

Hong Kong (CNN) -- Hundreds of dock workers demanding better pay and working conditions entered a seventh day of strikes in Hong Kong Wednesday, crippling the world's third busiest container port and causing widespread shipping delays.

About 500 workers and their supporters gathered outside Hong Kong's Kwai Tsing Container Terminal, where workers demanded a 15% pay increase and a collective bargaining relationship with the container terminal operator, Hong Kong International Terminals (HIT), according to the strike organizer, Chan Chiu-wai of the Hong Kong Confederation of Trade Unions.

HIT employs the workers through a number of contractors. Company officials said that the port was losing about $640,000 a day and the strike is causing berthing delays of up to 60 hours, according to the South China Morning Post.

HIT is a subsidiary of Hutchison Port Holdings Trust, which is owned by billionaire Li Ka-shing's Hutchison Whampoa Ltd. HIT did not respond to CNN's questions Wednesday.

Chan said that dock workers were presently paid $167 per day for 24 consecutive hours of work, less that than they received in 1997.

"We have been asking to talk with them for a very long time but both the terminal and the contractors have refused to talk to us," said Chan. "This is an indefinite strike, we have no time limit and we will strike until our demands are fulfilled."

Chan said staff often work shifts of up to 72 consecutive hours during high-season. "For this work, the salary is very low, the working conditions are very poor and the hours are very long, so we are often in the position of being understaffed and the workers have to work many hours overtime," Chan added.

HIT dismissed claims that workers were being paid less now than they were in 1997.

"It's also wrong that their pay is now lower than in 1997 or during SARS," HIT general manager Gerry Yim Lui-fai told the South China Morning Post.

The workers have attracted many supporters among student unions and pro-democracy parties in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Federation of Students have organized donation and supply collection points outside major train stations.

Hong Kong's pro-democracy Labour Party is also supporting the strike.

"We have raised HK$1.2 million ($154,000) so far to support the workers and we are paying them (HK)$1,000 a day during the strike," said Lee Cheuk-yan, Labour Party chairman. "We have also just gained the support of the International Trade Union Confederation and it's a very encouraging development. We are confident the strike will not be easily displaced."

More than 100 dock workers, including crane operators and stevedores, went on strike inside the Kwai Tsing Container terminal on March 28, demanding a $1.60 per hour raise. More workers have since joined the action, but they were forced to set up camp outside the port after a Hong Kong court granted HIT a temporary court injunction on April 1 banning unionists and their supporters from entering any of the four Kwai Tsing container terminals.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
updated 10:42 PM EDT, Thu October 23, 2014
Successful launch of lunar orbiter, seen as a precursor for a planned mission to the surface of the moon, marks significant advance for the country's space program.
updated 3:15 PM EDT, Thu October 23, 2014
Cpl. Nathan Cirillo, shot while standing guard at Ottawa's National War Memorial, was known for his easygoing manner and smile.
updated 4:06 PM EDT, Wed October 22, 2014
Non-stop chatter about actress' appearance is nasty, cruel, hurtful, invasive and sexist.
updated 6:08 PM EDT, Thu October 23, 2014
CEO's 30-min Putonghua chat is the perfect charm offensive for Facebook's last untapped market.
updated 11:45 PM EDT, Thu October 23, 2014
Chinese leaders want less odd architecture built in the country.
updated 4:58 PM EDT, Wed October 22, 2014
Air New Zealand's new 'Hobbit' safety video stars Peter Jackson, Elijah Wood, elves and orcs.
updated 10:14 AM EDT, Thu October 23, 2014
A 15-year-old pregnant girl is rescued from slavery, only to be charged with having sex outside of marriage, shocked rights activists say -- a charge potentially punishable by death.
updated 11:33 PM EDT, Tue October 21, 2014
After sushi and ramen, beef is on the list of must-eats for many visitors to Japan.
updated 12:07 PM EDT, Mon October 20, 2014
Airports judged on comfort, conveniences, cleanliness and customer service.
updated 1:48 PM EDT, Wed October 22, 2014
Scientists use CT scans to recreate a life-size image of the ancient king.
updated 5:59 AM EDT, Wed October 22, 2014
Despite billions spent on eradicating poppy production, Afghan farmers are growing bumper crops, a U.S. government report says.
updated 6:21 AM EDT, Fri October 24, 2014
Each day, CNN brings you an image capturing a moment to remember, defining the present in our changing world.
Browse through images from CNN teams around the world that you don't always see on news reports.
ADVERTISEMENT