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Serena storms past Sharapova to claim sixth Miami title

updated 3:29 PM EDT, Sat March 30, 2013
Serena Williams celebrates after beating Maria Sharapova in the Miami Masters final.
Serena Williams celebrates after beating Maria Sharapova in the Miami Masters final.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Serena Williams claims a record sixth Miami Masters title beating Maria Sharapova in three sets
  • Williams surpasses record for most wins at event she had jointly held with Steffi Graf

(CNN) -- Serena Williams came from a set down against Maria Sharapova to win the Miami Masters for a record sixth time on Saturday.

After a slow start, the world No.1 sprang into life in stunning fashion, winning the last 10 games of the match to eventually prevail 4-6 6-3 6-0.

Williams' win -- the 48th of her career -- means she surpasses the previous all-time title mark that she jointly held with Germany's Steffi Graf.

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"Maria definitely pushed me -- she did a really great job today," Williams said, WTATennis.com reported.

"I look forward to our next matches -- it's going to be really fun for the fans and for us and for everyone."

The match was turned on its head in the sixth game of the second set with Sharapova serving at 3-2. Williams won the game to love before streaking away with the set and the match.

Williams joins Martina Navratilova, Steffi Graf and Chris Evert as only the fourth player ever to win any WTA event six times.

Defeat for Sharapova means she has now finished runner-up for three successive years in Miami and five times in all.

"It's disappointing to end it like this but Serena played a great match, and I'm sure we'll play a few more times this year," Sharapova said, WTATennis.com reported.

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