Skip to main content
Part of complete coverage on

Slices of Raspberry Pi: Hacking the world's cheapest computer

The Raspberry Pi has been shortlisted for the London Design Museum's <a href='http://designmuseum.org/exhibitions/2013/designs-of-the-year-2013' target='_blank'>"Designs of the Year"</a> awards, with judges citing its affordability, power and accessibility to children. An exhibition accompanying the awards is showing off some of the creative uses of the hugely popular personal computer. The Raspberry Pi has been shortlisted for the London Design Museum's "Designs of the Year" awards, with judges citing its affordability, power and accessibility to children. An exhibition accompanying the awards is showing off some of the creative uses of the hugely popular personal computer.
HIDE CAPTION
Different flavors of Raspberry Pi
Different flavors of Raspberry Pi
Different flavors of Raspberry Pi
Different flavors of Raspberry Pi
Different flavors of Raspberry Pi
Different flavors of Raspberry Pi
Different flavors of Raspberry Pi
Different flavors of Raspberry Pi
<<
<
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
>
>>
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Raspberry Pi s an easily-programmable, open-source computer that sells for $25
  • Its cost, size and low power requirements have made it a hit with backyard inventors
  • Creative uses of the RPi are on display in London's Design Museum
  • They range from home weather surveillance stations to personal mobile phone networks

London (CNN) -- It may not be the prettiest, but the world's smallest, cheapest personal computer is inspiring a wave of delightful DIY innovation among tech hobbyists across the planet.

With a price tag of just $25, the unassuming Raspberry Pi is an easily-programmable, open-source single board computer, about the size of a credit card, whose cost, size and low power requirements make it ideally suited for backyard inventors.

Described by its creator, University of Cambridge professor Eben Upton as "an attempt to try and reboot some of that 1980s computer industry feel," the technology has been embraced by creative hackers worldwide and put to use in home weather stations to hot air balloon tracking and camera systems.

Read: Coder club turns out tween tech prodigies

"Too many people simply have no idea what goes on inside (computers). Inventions like the Raspberry Pi really help to change that
Alyssa Dayan, co-inventor of AirPi home weather surveillance station

The RPi has been shortlisted in London's Design Museum "Designs of the Year" awards, with judges citing its affordability, power and accessibility to children. As part of the exhibition accompanying the prizes, examples of creative uses of RPi are on display at the museum until July 7.

They include a stylish, personalized train departure board created by Gareth James of Hove, UK, which provides the times of the next trains to Brighton.

"It's great to have a dedicated piece of connected hardware that looks nice and sits and waits to be useful," he said. "Whenever I'm thinking of leaving the house I can easily check the next train time. Plus, it looks good on the wall... No longer do I end up hanging around on the cold train platform."

Read/Watch: Why everyone wants a slice of Raspberry Pi

Alyssa Dayan and Tom Hartley created AirPi, an air quality and weather surveillance station that uses RPi to take readings from an array of sensors, translating the data into meaningful information and uploading it on to the internet. The project cost only £55 on top of the cost of the RPi.

Divine inspiration behind Post-it Notes
Harvesting rubber from dandelions
The bionic hand with the human touch

Dayan said the team had designed the device and set up a website "not only to take our own air quality and weather readings but to encourage and teach others to do the same -- and hopefully eventually create a network of measurements coming in from across the world."

She said one of the key benefits of RPi was the ease with which components could be added to the board, which, combined with its cost, made it a great entry point to introduce children to electronics.

"I think the user-friendliness of computers has gotten to the extent that far too many people simply have no idea what goes on inside them," she said. "Inventions like the Raspberry Pi really help to change that."

A team from PA Consulting Group created a private cell phone network by connecting the RPi to a radio interface.

"We've shrunk a 30-foot base station into a three-inch Raspberry Pi and created our own mobile phone network," said PA's Frazer Bennett. "This proves what can be achieved through low-cost off the shelf-systems."

Read/Watch: Demystifying cloud threats and firewalls

In a more playful spirit, Tom Rees created a car out of Lego that is controlled using the console from a gaming system.

It is easier than ever to have your computer control your house, move a robotic arm, turn a wheel, read the temperature, or speak your weight. The sky is the limit
RPi enthusiast Tom Rees

"It is easier than ever (and less scary than ever) to have your computer control your house, move a robotic arm, turn a wheel, read the temperature, or speak your weight," he said. "The sky is the limit."

High-altitude ballooning enthusiast David Akerman can attest to that. He's using RPi to track and transmit photographs from his unmanned balloon flights, which have ascended 40.5 kilometers (25.2 miles) into near space with a camera.

"The Pi has plenty of memory and processor power, meaning that it can take several photographs and then send the best image to transmit," he said.

"Balloon payloads swing and rotate a lot and many of the images will be directly at the sun or the black sky, and my software rejects all of those."

Akerman, whose RPi invention isn't included in the design Museum exhibition, is tinkering on improvements that will allow him to send better and larger images from the flight, and is optimistic of besting his highest altitude on the next flight. "I'm hoping to fly this in the next few weeks," he said.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
updated 8:37 AM EDT, Thu August 21, 2014
It's like a chair that isn't there, but magically appears whenever you need it. It's called the Chairless Chair. Find out how it works.
updated 5:39 AM EDT, Fri August 8, 2014
Engineer Alan Bond has been developing a new concept for space travel for over 30 years -- and his creation is now on the verge of lift off.
updated 8:10 AM EDT, Fri July 25, 2014
Crumbling buildings, burnt-out PCs, and cracked screens -- a new generation of "self-healing" technologies could soon consign them to history.
updated 5:09 AM EDT, Tue June 24, 2014
Discover a dancing cactus field, basketball on the Hudson River, and mind-bending 3D projections on robotic screens.
updated 1:07 PM EDT, Fri May 23, 2014
Would you live there? Design student Peter Trimble says it's actually a surprisingly good idea.
updated 10:50 AM EDT, Wed May 14, 2014
Alpha Sphere
Singing Tesla coils, musical ice cream, vegetables on drums... and this ball? Find out how "hackers" have created a new generation of instruments.
updated 12:43 PM EDT, Wed May 28, 2014
Technology has long learned from nature, but now it's going micro. "Cellular biomimicry" sees designers take inspiration from plant and animal cells.
updated 1:08 PM EDT, Wed April 9, 2014
Forget wearable tech, embeddable implants are here. Learn more about the pioneers who are implanting devices into their bodies.
updated 6:26 AM EDT, Wed May 7, 2014
A visitor of the 'NEXT Berlin' conference tries out Google Glass, a wearable computer that responds to voice commands and displays information before your eyes. It is expected to go to market in late 2013.
We know how wearable tech can enhance our fitness lives but there's evidence that its most significant application is yet to come: the workplace.
updated 4:13 AM EDT, Thu April 10, 2014
Samsung's research unit announces new way to synthesize graphene, potentially opening the door to commercial production.
updated 8:15 AM EDT, Mon March 31, 2014
iRobot, creators of vacuuming robot Roomba reveal how they learned from secret experiments -- in space travel, minefields, and toys.
updated 12:23 PM EDT, Fri March 28, 2014
A light-bulb glowing in middle of a room with no wires attached. "It's the future," says Dr Katie Hall.
updated 11:26 AM EST, Mon March 3, 2014
Knee replacements that encourage cells to regrow could soon be manufactured -- by spiders. Find out how.
updated 9:03 AM EST, Fri February 14, 2014
Meet Chuck Hull: the humble American engineer who changed the world of manufacturing.
updated 9:48 AM EST, Thu February 6, 2014
The key to self-knowledge? Or just the return of the phony "mood ring"? Check out our top mood-sensing technology in development.
ADVERTISEMENT