Skip to main content
Part of complete coverage from

New pope brings hope for an era of outreach

By Donna Brazile, CNN Contributor
People pray after learning of the newly elected Pope Francis at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles on Wednesday, March 13. The former Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio of Argentina has made history as the first pontiff from Latin America. People pray after learning of the newly elected Pope Francis at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles on Wednesday, March 13. The former Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio of Argentina has made history as the first pontiff from Latin America.
HIDE CAPTION
The world reacts to new pope
The world reacts to new pope
The world reacts to new pope
The world reacts to new pope
The world reacts to new pope
The world reacts to new pope
The world reacts to new pope
The world reacts to new pope
The world reacts to new pope
The world reacts to new pope
The world reacts to new pope
The world reacts to new pope
The world reacts to new pope
The world reacts to new pope
The world reacts to new pope
The world reacts to new pope
The world reacts to new pope
The world reacts to new pope
The world reacts to new pope
<<
<
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
>
>>
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Donna Brazile: Pope Francis has already shown humility since being named
  • She says he can be seen as centrist: socially conservative, but champion for poor, afflicted
  • She says among reasons he was chosen was belief he can reform church after scandals
  • Brazile hopes he'll focus on inequality, set example of compassion

Editor's note: Donna Brazile, a CNN contributor and a Democratic strategist, is vice chairwoman for voter registration and participation at the Democratic National Committee. She is a nationally syndicated columnist, an adjunct professor at Georgetown University and author of "Cooking with Grease: Stirring the Pot in America." She was manager for the Gore-Lieberman presidential campaign in 2000.

(CNN) -- "I hope you haven't made a mistake," Pope Francis told the cardinals at his celebratory dinner after he was chosen to lead the Catholic Church. He then urged the assembled hierarchy to nourish their bodies, and said with a grin, "May God forgive you for what you've done."

It brought down the house.

Pope Francis has already brought surprising changes. He broke with tradition by asking the crowd in St. Peter's Square to pray for him, and then bowed to receive it. This struck at least one young Catholic male, interviewed for the TV cameras, as "the most humble thing I've ever seen a pope do."

Pope Francis refused to mount the platform previous popes stood on to receive the cardinals, one by one. "I'll stay down here," he told Vatican staff. He shocked many cardinals by choosing the name "Francis," after St. Francis of Assisi, a young man born to wealth, but who lived his life in rags, sitting with lepers and the poor outside the Sistine Chapel. Saint Francis is the patron saint of animals as well as the poor. He is often depicted in art with birds on his shoulder or held in his hands.

Some saw it as a sign when a seagull landed on top of the chimney that vents the smoke from burning ballots. What the press began to call "The Holy See Gull" sat for 40 minutes on the tin top over the smokestack. It then flew off, but shortly a gull landed again in the same place. The next smoke was white, for Pope Francis.

Opinion: Pope Francis is no herald of big changes

Judging from the cardinals I saw interviewed, the new pope is widely considered to be a centrist. He is socially conservative, opposing same-gender marriage, free condoms and abortion, yet he is also known for his care for AIDS patients, washing and kissing their feet, and for baptizing the babies of unwed mothers who other clerics had turned down.

Become a fan of CNNOpinion
Stay up to date on the latest opinion, analysis and conversations through social media. Join us at Facebook/CNNOpinion and follow us @CNNOpinion on Twitter. We welcome your ideas and comments.



He brings a number of "firsts." He is the first modern non-European pope. He is the first pope from Latin America (his father was an Italian immigrant) a continent that has 39% of the world's Catholics. He is the first pope who is a Jesuit, a Catholic order that focuses on teaching youth and social justice.

But while reporters focus on these firsts, there are other reasons that help explain why the cardinals, in Pope Francis' words, went "to the end of the Earth" to find the man to lead the Catholic world, with its 1.2 billion members.

Opinion: Pope Francis, open up the church

Diaz: 'The name ... is very significant'
Top 5 papal priorties for Los Angeles
Pope to cardinals: Pass wisdom to young

Four reasons repeatedly came up in interviews with Catholic clerics: They felt it was time to shift the church's geographic center, they like his pastoral centrism, they believe emphasis on ministering to the poor has been missing and they hold a strong conviction that Pope Francis is the man to reform and rebuild a church that has been beset by scandals.

That phrase, "rebuilding the church" was mentioned by him, according to reports of the pope's first homily. The phrase also comes from the story of St. Francis, who began his ministry by hearing a call to "rebuild my church." Pope Francis put his emphasis on the spirituality of the church as being first, lest the church be seen as little more than "a compassionate NGO" (non-governmental organization).

Navarrette: Pope pick a signal to Latino Catholics

As a practicing Catholic, my personal, fervent hope is that Pope Francis will revive an interest and compassion for the poor. "We live in the most unequal part of the world, which has grown the most yet reduced misery the least," Pope Francis said in 2007. "The unjust distribution of goods persists," he said, "creating a situation of social sin that cries out to heaven and limits the possibilities of a fuller life for so many of our brothers."

There are indications some cardinals hope this pope will be Christian-friendly to Islam and the developing world. Cardinal Angelo Scola, the archbishop of Milan, heads a foundation to promote Muslim-Christian understanding, and looks after Afghanistan's only Catholic Church as if it were in his diocese. Slamet Effendy Yusuf, a Muslim and head of the Indonesian Ulema Council, told the Christian Science Monitor, "We believe this is a new chapter in the history of relations between Muslims and Catholics."

I noticed that many cardinals remarked with wonder over the news that Pope Francis, while he was in Buenos Aires, lived in an austere apartment, cooked his own food and took the trolley and subway by himself. That this is a matter of wonder to some who live in stone mansions and have chauffeured cars and chefs is a strong indication change has already arrived—brought by example.

Follow us on Twitter @CNNOpinion

Join us on Facebook/CNNOpinion

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Donna Brazile.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
updated 8:31 AM EDT, Fri August 22, 2014
James Dawes says calling ISIS evil over and over again could very well make it harder to stop them.
updated 8:23 AM EDT, Fri August 22, 2014
Retired Lt. Gen. Mark Hertling says he learned that the territory ISIS wants to control is amazingly complex.
updated 10:50 AM EDT, Thu August 21, 2014
David Weinberger says Twitter and other social networks have been vested with a responsibility, and a trust, they did not ask for.
updated 7:03 AM EDT, Fri August 22, 2014
John Inazu says the slogan "We are Ferguson" is meant to express empathy and solidarity. It's not true: Not all of us live in those circumstances. But we all made them.
updated 3:51 PM EDT, Wed August 20, 2014
Cerue Garlo says Liberia is desperate for help amid a Ebola outbreak that has touched every aspect of life.
updated 1:42 PM EDT, Thu August 21, 2014
Eric Liu says Republicans who want to restrict voting may win now, but the party will suffer in the long term.
updated 11:38 AM EDT, Thu August 21, 2014
Jay Parini: Jesus, Pope and now researchers agree: Wealth decreases our ability to sympathize with the poor.
updated 8:00 AM EDT, Thu August 21, 2014
Judy Melinek offers a medical examiner's perspective on what happens when police kill people like Michael Brown.
updated 6:03 PM EDT, Tue August 19, 2014
It used to be billy clubs, fire hoses and snarling German shepherds. Now it's armored personnel carriers and flash-bang grenades, writes Kara Dansky.
updated 1:27 PM EDT, Wed August 20, 2014
Maria Haberfeld: People who are unfamiliar with police work can reasonably ask, why was an unarmed man shot so many times, and why was deadly force used at all?
updated 5:52 PM EDT, Mon August 18, 2014
Ruben Navarrette notes that this fall, minority students will outnumber white students at America's public schools.
updated 5:21 PM EDT, Tue August 19, 2014
Humans have driven to extinction four marine mammal species in modern times. As you read this, we are on the brink of losing the fifth, write three experts.
updated 7:58 AM EDT, Tue August 19, 2014
It's been ten days since Michael Brown was killed, and his family is still waiting for information from investigators about what happened to their young man, writes Mel Robbins
updated 8:42 AM EDT, Mon August 18, 2014
The former U.K. prime minister and current U.N. envoy says there are 500 days left to fulfill the Millennium Goals' promise to children.
updated 1:38 PM EDT, Wed August 20, 2014
Peter Bergen says the terror group is a huge threat in Iraq but only a potential one in the U.S.
updated 4:06 PM EDT, Mon August 18, 2014
Pepper Schwartz asks why young women are so entranced with Kardashian, who's putting together a 352-page book of selfies
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT