Skip to main content

U.N. Security Council slams North Korea, expands sanctions

From Richard Roth, CNN
updated 10:17 AM EST, Thu January 24, 2013
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • NEW: North Korea will continue to launch satellites, Foreign Ministry says
  • A resolution condemning North Korea's recent rocket launch is unanimously approved
  • "(It) makes clear that there will be an increasingly steep price to pay," says Susan Rice
  • U.S. believes launch tested ballistic missile technology; North Korea says it was for science

United Nations (CNN) -- The United Nations Security Council unanimously adopted on Tuesday a resolution condemning North Korea's recent rocket launch and expanding existing U.N. sanctions.

"This resolution demonstrates to North Korea that there are unanimous and significant consequences for its flagrant violation of its obligations under previous resolutions," the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Susan Rice, told reporters after the vote.

Read more: Huge crowds gather in North Korean capital to celebrate rocket launch

"More importantly, the provisions of this resolution -- both new sanctions and the tightening and expanding of existing measures -- concretely help to impede the growth of North Korea's (weapons of mass destruction) program and reduce the threat of proliferation by targeting entities and individuals directly involved in these programs," she said.

Specifically, the resolution imposes sanctions on a handful of North Korean companies, a bank and its space agency. Four individuals also were added to the blacklist.

Read more: U.S. official: North Korea likely deceived U.S., allies before launching rocket

A North Korean soldier uses binoculars on Thursday, February 6, to look at South Korea from the border village of Panmunjom, which has separated the two Koreas since the Korean War. A new United Nations report describes a brutal North Korean state "that does not have any parallel in the contemporary world." A North Korean soldier uses binoculars on Thursday, February 6, to look at South Korea from the border village of Panmunjom, which has separated the two Koreas since the Korean War. A new United Nations report describes a brutal North Korean state "that does not have any parallel in the contemporary world."
Kim Jong Un and North Korea's military
HIDE CAPTION
<<
<
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
>
>>
Photos: Kim Jong Un\'s military Photos: Kim Jong Un's military
Well-wishers mob a smiling North Korean leader Kim Jong Un (without hat) on Wednesday after the successful launch of the country's first satellite. Well-wishers mob a smiling North Korean leader Kim Jong Un (without hat) on Wednesday after the successful launch of the country's first satellite.
Inside North Korea's missile launch
HIDE CAPTION
<<
<
1
2
3
4
5
6
>
>>
Photos: Inside North Korea\'s missile launch Photos: Inside North Korea's missile launch
Richardson explains North Korea trip
Richardson: U.S. should engage N. Korea
North Korea celebrates rocket launch

Pyongyang has previously pressed ahead with rocket launches and nuclear tests despite international sanctions.

In December, North Korea angered many in the international community by launching a long-range rocket that appeared to put a satellite in orbit, a breakthrough for the reclusive, nuclear-equipped state.

Read more: South Korean officials: North Korean rocket could hit U.S. mainland

The rocket successfully blasted off from a space center on the country's west coast and delivered a satellite into its intended orbit, the North Korean regime said. The launch followed a botched attempt in April and came just days after Pyongyang suggested a planned launch could be delayed.

Many nations, such as the United States and South Korea, considered the rocket launch to be a cover for testing ballistic missile technology. Pyongyang has insisted its aim was to place a scientific satellite in space "for peaceful purposes."

Read more: North Korea silences doubters, raises fears with rocket launch

"Today's resolution makes clear that there will be an increasingly steep price to pay if North Korea again chooses confrontation with this council and the international community," Rice said.

North Korea's Foreign Ministry issued a response to the Security Council's action, saying it will maintain its military power and continue to launch "peaceful satellites."

"We will continue to expand and strengthen our self-defensive military power, including nuclear deterrence, to cope with U.S.'s scheme of putting (on) sanction pressures," said the statement, which was carried by KCNA, North Korea's state news agency.

Read more: North Korea's rocket launches cost $1.3 billion

North Korea also said it is open to peace talks but would not discuss giving up its nuclear weapons.

"In the future, there could be talks about the peace and stability of the Korean Peninsula, but there won't be any dialogue regarding (the) denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula," the statement said.

South Korea said its northern neighbor should "halt any additional provocation, and it should clarify its effort of denuclearization through specific action."

South Korea also said that it did not see any unusual movement from North Korea after the resolution was passed.

"As of 10 a.m. (Wednesday) Korea time (8 p.m. ET Tuesday), no unusual movements were observed," said Unification Ministry spokeswoman Park Soo-jin.

North Korea says new nuclear test will be part of fight against U.S.

CNN's KJ Kwon contributed to this report.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
updated 7:27 AM EDT, Wed April 2, 2014
Experts warn that under Kim Jong Un's rule, Pyongyang has shown an even greater willingness to raise the stakes than before.
updated 9:14 AM EDT, Tue March 18, 2014
China and North Korea criticize a U.N. report that found crimes against humanity committed in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.
updated 8:05 AM EDT, Mon March 17, 2014
Megumi Yokota was only 13 when she was abducted by a North Korean agent in the 1970s. What happened after that?
updated 12:30 AM EDT, Wed March 12, 2014
Report: North Korea uses multiple techniques to defy sanctions, and shows no signs of abandoning its nuclear missile programs.
updated 3:17 AM EST, Fri February 21, 2014
Families torn apart for more than 60 years -- separated by the Korean War -- began to reunite at a mountain resort in North Korea Thursday.
updated 6:50 AM EST, Tue February 18, 2014
A stunning catalog of torture and the widespread abuse of even the weakest of North Koreans reveal a portrait of a brutal state, the UN reported.
updated 11:31 PM EST, Mon February 17, 2014
Former prisoners in North Korea describe horrific stories of being tortured by authorities.
updated 10:27 AM EST, Fri February 14, 2014
Skiing is not the first thing that springs to mind when thinking about the isolated nation, but North Korea's ski resort is world class.
updated 10:15 PM EST, Fri February 7, 2014
American Kenneth Bae, who is being held in North Korea, has been moved from a hospital to a labor camp.
updated 9:13 PM EST, Tue January 7, 2014
Why is he being held by North Korea in a prison camp? These are the questions for many since his arrest in the isolated country in 2012.
updated 3:18 AM EST, Mon January 27, 2014
The first time the South Korean factory owner watched his North Korean employees nibble on a Choco Pie, they appeared shocked.
updated 8:26 PM EST, Tue January 7, 2014
Dennis Rodman's "Big Bang in Pyongyang" may be in a league of its own, but other stars too have mixed with repressive regimes before.
updated 1:00 PM EST, Thu December 19, 2013
Former NBA star Dennis Rodman arrives in North Korea to train basketball players, state-run media reports.
updated 9:50 PM EST, Tue December 17, 2013
The nation held a memorial in the honor of former North Korean leader, Kim Jong Il on the second anniversary of his death.
updated 10:58 AM EST, Fri December 13, 2013
Days after he was removed from his powerful military post, Jang Song Thaek was called a traitor and executed.
ADVERTISEMENT