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Chipmaker ordered to pay $1.17 billion in patents judgment denies wrongdoing

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Carnegie Mellon University claims Marvell Technology Group infringed on patents
  • In a statement, the company says the law and evidence do not support the finding
  • Attorneys: Jury found Marvell sold chips featuring Carnegie Mellon tech without a license

(CNN) -- Marvell Technology Group on Thursday denied it infringed on technology patents, a day after a federal jury in Pennsylvania ordered the company to pay $1.17 billion in damages to Carnegie Mellon University.

A lawsuit filed in 2009 by the Pittsburgh university claimed that Marvell and its U.S. operating subsidiary, Marvell Semiconductor Inc., infringed on its patented technology fundamental for "increasing the accuracy with which hard disk drive circuits read data from high-speed magnetic disks," according to a press release from K&L Gates, the law firm representing Carnegie Mellon.

According to a company statement, Marvell believes the evidence and the law do not support the jury's findings of infringement or the award of damages.

"Marvell and MSI intend to vigorously challenge the judgment through all appropriate post trial motions and appeal processes," Marvell said in the statement.

The damages could be increased as much as threefold by U.S. District Court Judge Nora Barry Fischer, since the jury found Marvell's infringements were willful, according to K&L Gates.

On Wednesday, the jury also found Marvell sold billions of chips incorporating the university's technology without a license to do so, according to K&L Gates.

Marvell has denied the claim.

In a statement, Carnegie Mellon said, "We felt the evidence we submitted was compelling, and the jury agreed. Protection of the discoveries of our faculty and students is very important to us."

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