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Florida man indicted in shooting of unarmed teen

By CNN Staff
updated 11:23 AM EST, Fri December 14, 2012
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Michael Dunn is indicted on charges of first degree murder
  • He also faces attempted first degree murder charges
  • The encounter began with the suspect complaining about the teens' loud music, police say

(CNN) -- Two weeks after being arrested for a shooting he said was in self-defense, a Florida man has been indicted on a charge of first degree murder and three counts of attempted first degree murder.

Michael Dunn also faces a charge of shooting or throwing deadly missiles.

The indictment came down Thursday in connection with the November 26 shooting that killed 17-year-old Jordan Davis in Jacksonville.

Dunn has been held without bond since his arrest.

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The violence was sparked by a confrontation about loud music at a gas station, the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office said.

Dunn told authorities that he had asked the teens to turn down the blaring music coming from their vehicle, which was parked next to his as he waited for his girlfriend to return to the car.

He heard threats from the teens, Dunn told police, he felt threatened and he thought he saw a gun in the teens' car. He grabbed his gun and fired at least eight shots, authorities said.

Davis, among the teens, was killed. No guns were found inside the teens' car, the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office said.

Some have compared this incident to the Trayvon Martin case, the shooting of an unarmed Florida teen earlier this year that sparked nationwide protests and inflamed public passions over race relations and gun control. Martin's shooting also focused a spotlight on Florida's controversial "Stand Your Ground" law, which allows the use of deadly force when a person perceives a threat to safety.

Similar to Martin, Davis was 17, unarmed and African-American.

Dunn's attorney has rejected such comparisons.

CNN's John Branch contributed to this report.

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