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Pakistani schoolgirl activist Malala thanks supporters after being shot by Taliban

By the CNN Wire Staff
updated 5:27 AM EST, Mon December 3, 2012
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Malala Yousufzai says thank you for "the outpouring of love and support"
  • She is recovering in Britain after being shot by Taliban gunmen in Pakistan
  • Her father says she is walking and reading books
  • She expresses commitment to the cause of promoting girls' education

(CNN) -- Malala Yousufzai, the Pakistani schoolgirl activist who was shot in the head by the Taliban, has expressed gratitude to the people around the world who have supported her as she recovers from the traumatic attack.

"Thank you so much for the outpouring of love and support," Malala said in a message read by Anderson Cooper at the CNN Heroes ceremony in Los Angeles. "I thank the people that supported me without distinguishing religion and color."

Malala has been campaigning for girls' right to education in a conservative area of Pakistan for years.

In her message, she praised girls in northwestern Pakistan "who are continuing their studies despite threats from militants."

Malala Yousafzai returns to school for the first time at Edgbaston High School for Girls in Birmingham, England, on March 19. The 15-year-old said she had "achieved her dream." Malala Yousafzai returns to school for the first time at Edgbaston High School for Girls in Birmingham, England, on March 19. The 15-year-old said she had "achieved her dream."
Malala's road to recovery
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Photos: Malala\'s recovery Photos: Malala's recovery
Gordon Brown supports Malala's message

She is now at a hospital in Britain, where she was transferred to soon after the assassination attempt in northwestern Pakistan in October. Examinations there revealed that she had suffered no major neurological damage, but she still faces a long struggle to recover from her injuries.

Malala is reading books and walking in the hospital in the city of Birmingham, according to her father, Ziauddin Yousufzai.

Her story generated a huge amount sympathy and support in Pakistan and across the globe.

The Pakistani Taliban have threatened to go after her again, but Malala appears to be undeterred from her campaigning.

"People have actually supported a cause, not an individual," she said in her message. "Let's work together to educate girls around the world."

CNN's Kyle Almond and journalist Nasir Habib contributed to this report.

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