Skip to main content

Thai police use tear gas at government protest

By the CNN Wire Staff
updated 9:06 PM EST, Sun November 25, 2012
Demonstrators press toward police during a large anti-government protest on Saturday, November 24, in Bangkok, Thailand. The Siam Pitak group, which sponsored the protest, cited alleged government corruption and anti-monarchist elements within the ruling party as grounds for the protest. Police used tear gas and baton charges againt protesters. Demonstrators press toward police during a large anti-government protest on Saturday, November 24, in Bangkok, Thailand. The Siam Pitak group, which sponsored the protest, cited alleged government corruption and anti-monarchist elements within the ruling party as grounds for the protest. Police used tear gas and baton charges againt protesters.
HIDE CAPTION
Police, protesters clash in Thailand
Police, protesters clash in Thailand
Police, protesters clash in Thailand
Police, protesters clash in Thailand
Police, protesters clash in Thailand
Police, protesters clash in Thailand
Police, protesters clash in Thailand
Police, protesters clash in Thailand
Police, protesters clash in Thailand
Police, protesters clash in Thailand
Police, protesters clash in Thailand
Police, protesters clash in Thailand
Police, protesters clash in Thailand
Police, protesters clash in Thailand
Police, protesters clash in Thailand
<<
<
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
>
>>
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • The protest was organized by an anti-government group
  • The group's leader calls off the rally after police step in
  • Police defend their use of tear gas
  • More than 130 people are detained

Bangkok, Thailand (CNN) -- The leader of a Thai anti-government party called off a rally Saturday after police used tear gas to disperse more than 50,000 people who showed up in Bangkok to take part, the state-run Thai news agency reported.

Gen. Boonlert Kaewprasit also said he will not head any anti-government rally in the future and will not enter politics, the MCOT news agency said.

Boonlert said he called off Saturday's rally by the Pitak Siam group to save protesters' lives. Just before the rally was to begin Saturday morning at Bangkok's Royal Plaza, MCOT said, police used tear gas to disperse the crowd.

When the crowd tried to break through a concrete barrier to get to the rally site, police in riot gear with shields used tear gas again to push protesters back.

More than 130 people were reportedly detained by police and 10 people, including four police officers, were reportedly hurt, mostly from tear gas, MCOT said.

Pitak Siam, whose name means "Protecting Siam," wants to overthrow the government of Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, who has been in office since last year, MCOT reported.

The group is separate from the so-called Yellow Shirts, a group that formed to oust Yingluck's brother, Thaksin Shinawatra, from power. Thaksin was exiled after a military coup in 2006.

Boonlert said use of the tear gas was "improper" because the protesters were unarmed, but police defended the move, saying it was the best way to avoid clashes.

Police Gen. Adul Saengsingkaew said officers first used the tear gas because protesters tried to enter a restricted area near the Royal Plaza.

The protesters, he said in a statement, "proceeded to cut through seven layers of barbed wire, pushing back the officials as well as ramming a large-sized vehicle into the officers. As such, it was necessary for the officers to carry out the procedures in negotiating, issuing a warning and using tear gas which is considered to be in accordance to what was agreed, the law and rules of engagement."

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
updated 10:26 AM EST, Wed February 6, 2013
Advocates say the exam includes unnecessarily invasive and irrelevant procedures -- like a so-called "two finger" test.
updated 7:09 PM EST, Tue February 5, 2013
Supplies of food, clothing and fuel are running short in Damascus and people are going hungry as the civil war drags on.
updated 1:01 PM EST, Wed February 6, 2013
Supporters of Richard III want a reconstruction of his head to bring a human aspect to a leader portrayed as a murderous villain.
updated 10:48 AM EST, Tue February 5, 2013
Robert Fowler spent 130 days held hostage by the same al Qaeda group that was behind the Algeria massacre. He shares his experience.
updated 12:07 AM EST, Wed February 6, 2013
As "We are the World" plays, a video shows what looks like a nuclear attack on the U.S. Jim Clancy reports on a bizarre video from North Korea.
The relationship is, once again, cold enough to make Obama's much-trumpeted "reset" in Russian-U.S. relations seem thoroughly off the rails.
Ten years on, what do you think the Iraq war has changed in you, and in your country? Send us your thoughts and experiences.
updated 7:15 AM EST, Tue February 5, 2013
Musician Daniela Mercury has sold more than 12 million albums worldwide over a career span of nearly 30 years.
Photojournalist Alison Wright travelled the world to capture its many faces in her latest book, "Face to Face: Portraits of the Human Spirit."
updated 7:06 PM EST, Tue February 5, 2013
Europol claims 380 soccer matches, including top level ones, were fixed - as the scandal widens, CNN's Dan Rivers looks at how it's done.
updated 7:37 AM EST, Wed February 6, 2013
That galaxy far, far away is apparently bigger than first thought. The "Star Wars" franchise will get two spinoff movies, Disney announced.
updated 2:18 AM EST, Fri February 8, 2013
It's an essential part of any trip, an activity we all take part in. Yet almost none of us are any good at it. Souvenir buying is too often an obligatory slog.
ADVERTISEMENT