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Frankel's babies on Christmas wish list

updated 11:40 AM EST, Wed November 14, 2012
Frankel in action with jockey Tom Queally on board during his unbeaten 14-race streak which helped make him into a cult hero.
Frankel in action with jockey Tom Queally on board during his unbeaten 14-race streak which helped make him into a cult hero.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Frankel available for $198,600 after being retired to stud
  • Won all 14 races and claimed $4.77 million in prize money
  • Khalid Abdulla's horse could make millions through future offspring
  • American stallion Storm Cat commanded a $500,000 fee at the peak of his stud career

(CNN) -- Frankel's babies will be on the Christmas wish list for hundreds of potential owners -- but they'll need to pay up $198,600 for the honor.

The four-year-old won all 14 of his races and racked up $4.77 million in prize money before retiring to stud following his victory in the Champions Stakes at Ascot in October.

Each owner whose mare breeds with Frankel, will need to pay nearly $200,000 for the privilege with Frankel's owners expecting over 100 females to be impregnated in this year alone.

Frankel retains unbeaten record in dramatic fashion at Ascot

Frankel ends career in dramatic style

Frankel will stud at owner's Khalid Abdulla's Banstead Manor, which is part of his Juddemonte Farms group after leaving Warren Stables, the yard of trainer Henry Cecil last week.

"The fee for Frankel reflects his merits as being perhaps the greatest racehorse we have ever witnessed," said Juddmonte Farms' general manager Philip Mitchell on the firm's official website.

"He is by Galileo, who is now recognized as the best sire in the world, and out of Kind, a winner of six races (from five to seven furlongs) and herself a daughter of one of the most influential stallions in the history of thoroughbred breeding, Danehill."

Fabulous Frankel: What made the thoroughbred so special

Frankel, named after American trainer Bobby Frankel who died three years ago, ended his career in perfect style at Ascot last month by winning the Champion Stakes.

While the stud fee for Frankel is sizeable, it falls well short of the $500,000 paid for American stallion Storm Cat a decade ago.

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