Skip to main content
Part of complete coverage on

Can Hu retain clout after handover?

By Jaime A. FlorCruz, CNN
updated 2:47 PM EST, Mon November 12, 2012
Chinese President Hu Jintao arrives to attend an APEC summit in the Russian city of Vladivostok on September 8, 2012.
Chinese President Hu Jintao arrives to attend an APEC summit in the Russian city of Vladivostok on September 8, 2012.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Hu Jintao preparing to hand over power to presumptive successor, Xi Jinping
  • But experts question whether he will really retire, or maintain some vestiges of office
  • Chinese politicians caught up in complex factional horse-trading
  • Final decision on makeup of new Central Committee expected this week

Beijing (CNN) -- Hu Jintao is stepping down this week as the Communist Party's general secretary -- the primus inter pares in the party politburo, China's elite decision-making body.

In March next year, he is also expected to hand over his post as China's state president to his presumptive successor, Xi Jinping.

But is the 69-year-old Hu retiring completely?

Will he give up all his posts, including chairmanship of the Central Military Commission (CMC), an influential post that oversees major national security and military affairs?

"We don't know if he will step down yet," said Joseph Cheng, professor at City University of Hong Kong. "The party congress is still in the bargaining process. For Xi Jinping, he needs time to consolidate his power no matter if Hu will retire or not."

The months leading up to the ongoing 18th party congress, which is held once every five years, have brought contentious back-room horse-trading among the party elite, including party chief Hu Jintao and retired leaders like former president Jiang Zemin, China analysts say.

How China's leadership is chosen
Who is Xi Jinping?
Challenges for China's new leaders
China's Hu Jintao issues warning

Speculation is rife as to why Hu would give up the CMC chair. Wenran Jiang, a professor at University of Alberta in Canada, sees two possible reasons. "One is that the different forces within the party are intensely locked in negotiations over top appointments and Hu steps down in exchange for some personnel or policy arrangements that Hu wants. Another is possibly a new consensus that the institutional handover of leadership will be straightforward... This could be either initiated by Hu or by a collective decision."

Women breaking China's glass ceiling?

The factional bargaining will culminate on Wednesday, when the party congress closes with the election of a new Central Committee, a top body of more than 200 party leaders and cadres. The next day, the committee will meet to name a new politburo and its new standing committee -- China's elite ruling council.

It will also choose the new members of the Central Disciplinary Inspection Commission, an internal anti-corruption body, and the Central Military Commission (CMC).

In theory, the congress delegates and the Central Committee members have some influence over -- and formally vote on --leadership decisions.

However, the lineup is largely decided among the most powerful party leaders and elders.

Why is CMC chairmanship important?

It is the highest decision-making body in military affairs and is usually chaired by the Communist Party chief. Its members include the defense minister and top military commanders.

The chair of the CMC is one of the most powerful leaders in Chinese politics, along with the Communist Party chief and State President.

Hu warns party of 'enemy within'

In the recent past, all three posts have been held by one person.

But Hu will not be an exception if he decides to cling on to the CMC post after retirement.

Deng Xiaoping kept his CMC chair and used it to exercise considerable power and influence even after he retired.

Deng's successor Jiang Zemin also retained his CMC chair after he handed over top posts to Hu Jintao in 2002.

However, Jiang gave it up to Hu in 2004, apparently due to pressure from party stalwarts and military leaders.

Mao's shadow over China
What China's leadership change means
China's Communist Party Congress meets
China prepares for political transition

Only then was Hu able to solidify his position as paramount leader.

Like Deng and Jiang, analysts say, Hu would want to avoid getting relegated into a lame duck position after retirement.

At stake for Hu is the chance to perpetuate his influence in the leading party bodies and policy-making institutions.

It will be a sign of Hu's continued political clout if he stays, but analysts say Hu can also ensure that by proxy.

"Even if he retires, he will not retire completely," said Joseph Cheng. "He wants to maintain continuity of his influence in the party and in the military."

How China's party congress works

Cheng noted that Fan Changlong, a regional commander of the People's Liberation Army, and Xu Qiliang, commander of the Chinese Air Force -- both recently appointed to the CMC -- are close to Hu.

Hu has marshaled much of his political capital to promote his top protégé, Li Keqiang, already in the party's inner circle and executive vice premier, as potential successor.

Whether Hu can install Li ahead of Xi Jinping, who is regarded as Jiang Zemin's choice, is deemed a measure of Hu's strength.

Li is expected to move to the top, but not as Hu's successor as paramount leader.

Xi, 59, was elected last week as the ad hoc secretary general of the congress proceedings, another signal that he is firmly lined up to inherit Hu's top posts.

The only question that remains, experts say, is when Xi will take up the CMC chairmanship.

"Xi's position will be enhanced if Hu steps down now," said Wenran Jiang. "He can assume full institutional power. Of course, that will not change the basic dynamics that Xi is a team leader in a collective decision-making system. He will have to build consensus for any major policy initiatives."

Such a consensus will be even more important if Xi intends to pursue significant political reform measures.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
See CNN's complete coverage on China.
updated 3:12 AM EDT, Wed July 30, 2014
All you need to know about the tainted meat produce that affects fast food restaurants across China, Hong Kong, and Japan.
updated 10:30 PM EDT, Thu July 17, 2014
Some savvy individuals in China are claiming naming rights to valuable foreign brands. Here's how companies can combat them.
updated 5:11 AM EDT, Wed July 16, 2014
Is Xi Jinping a true reformist or merely a "dictator" in disguise? CNN's Beijing bureau chief Jaime FlorCruz dissects the leader's policies
updated 11:44 PM EDT, Mon July 7, 2014
With a population of 1.3 billion, you'd think that there would be 11 people in China who are good enough to put up a fight on the football pitch.
updated 2:31 AM EDT, Fri July 4, 2014
26-year-old Ji Cheng is the first rider from China to compete for competitive cycling's highest honor.
updated 7:24 AM EDT, Mon July 7, 2014
China's richest man, Wang Jianlin, may not yet be a household name outside of China, but that could be about to change.
updated 12:14 AM EDT, Fri July 4, 2014
Hong Kong's narrow streets were once a dazzling gallery of neon, where banks and even bordellos plied their trade under sizzling tubular signs.
updated 7:57 PM EDT, Thu July 3, 2014
When President Xi Jinping arrives in Seoul this week, the Chinese leader will have passed over North Korea in favor of its arch rival.
updated 7:59 AM EDT, Thu July 3, 2014
Three more officials have been given the chop as part of China's anti-corruption drive, including former aides to the retired security chief.
updated 9:05 AM EDT, Tue July 1, 2014
As thousands of Hong Kongers prepare for an annual protest, voices in China's press warn pro-democracy activism is a bad idea.
updated 12:37 AM EDT, Mon June 30, 2014
Hong Kongers are demanding the right to directly elect their next leader, setting up a face-off with Beijing.
updated 2:56 AM EDT, Tue July 1, 2014
The push for democratic reform in Hong Kong is testing China's "one country, two systems" model.
updated 7:56 AM EDT, Mon June 30, 2014
Along a winding Chinese mountain road dotted with inns and restaurants is Jinan Orphanage, a place of refuge and site for troubled parents to dump unwanted children.
updated 4:36 AM EDT, Thu June 26, 2014
CNN's Kristie Lu Stout invites Isaac Mao, Han Dongfang, and James Miles to discuss the rise of civil society in China and social media's crucial role.
updated 11:34 PM EDT, Wed June 25, 2014
Chen Guangbiao wants rich people to give more to charity and he'll do anything to get their attention, including buying lunch for poor New Yorkers.
updated 7:44 AM EDT, Thu June 26, 2014
Architects are planning to build the future world's tallest towers in China. They're going to come in pretty colors.
updated 7:47 AM EDT, Mon June 23, 2014
Anna Coren visits Yulin's annual dog meat festival. Dogs are part of the daily diet here, with an estimated 10,000 dogs killed for the festival alone.
updated 2:38 AM EDT, Thu June 19, 2014
People know little about sex, but are having plenty of it. We take a look at the ramifications of a lack of sex education in China.
updated 4:12 AM EDT, Fri June 13, 2014
Hong Kongers have reacted angrily to a Chinese government white paper affirming Beijing's control over the territory.
The emphasis on national glory -- rather than purely personal achievement -- is key.
updated 12:14 PM EDT, Mon June 16, 2014
A replica of the Effel Tower in Tianducheng, a luxury real estate development located in Hangzhou, east China's Zhejiang province.
What's the Eiffel Tower doing in China? Replica towns of the world's most famous monuments spring up all over China.
updated 8:13 PM EDT, Tue June 10, 2014
Rapid development hasn't just boosted the economy -- it has opened up vast swathes of the country, says a man who has spent much of his life exploring it.
updated 2:54 AM EDT, Tue June 10, 2014
The World Cup is apparently making a lot of people "ill" in China.
ADVERTISEMENT