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Readers: No way pets are getting left behind if disaster strikes

By CNN iReport staff
updated 10:52 AM EDT, Fri November 2, 2012
A veterinary technician cares for a cat at the ASPCA's Bergh Memorial Animal Hospital.
A veterinary technician cares for a cat at the ASPCA's Bergh Memorial Animal Hospital.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Superstorm Sandy raises questions about what to do with pets when evacuating
  • Some fear people may hesitate to evacuate without their pets
  • Readers share stories of emergency situations with their pets

(CNN) -- Superstorm Sandy forced many residents along the East Coast to leave their homes, raising questions of what to do with their pets. After Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast, some began to suspect people were reluctant to evacuate and leave behind their pets.

The 2006 PETS Act made it mandatory for local and state governments to include plans for pets in their emergency procedures. It also opened the gates for FEMA funds to be put toward the welfare of animals in disaster zones.

Readers shared their own stories of disaster and emergency and how they dealt with their pets while so much was going on.

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Have you ever been in a situation like this? Share your story and tips in the comments section below or post a video response on CNN iReport.

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