Crane continues to dangle over Manhattan

See high winds snap crane top
See high winds snap crane top

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    See high winds snap crane top

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See high winds snap crane top 01:16

Story highlights

  • Police have cordoned off the area around the base of the One57 building on West 57th street
  • The arm is swaying atop the building, which remains under construction
  • As gusts of up to 60 mph barreled through New York, the crane was damaged Monday

Affixed to a high-rise apartment building in one of midtown Manhattan's more coveted locations, the arm of a construction crane damaged by Superstorm Sandy continued to dangle perilously 90 stories above New York City.

Police have cordoned off the area around the base of the One57 building on West 57th street, as New Yorkers recover from a rare convergence of weather systems that killed at least 15 people across the state.

The arm can be seen slowly swaying atop the building, which remains under construction.

Superstorm aftermath from every angle
Superstorm aftermath from every angle

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    Superstorm aftermath from every angle

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Superstorm aftermath from every angle 01:08
Broken crane suspended over NYC
Broken crane suspended over NYC

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    Broken crane suspended over NYC

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Broken crane suspended over NYC 02:14

Photos: New York recovers from Sandy

Mayor Michael Bloomberg said the surrounding area, including the posh Le Parker Meridien hotel, has since been evacuated.

"We're sorry for the inconvenience, but better be safe than sorry," the mayor said during a news conference.

As gusts of up to 60 mph barreled through New York, the crane was damaged Monday afternoon atop a building that is planned to be among the tallest residential structures in Manhattan, offering views that potentially range from Central Park to the city's Financial District.

"The hurricane storm winds have pushed the crane boom over the cab section of the high-rise crane at One 57th Street," said Mary Costello, senior vice president for Lend Lease, the property group managing the site.

Meanwhile, New Yorkers continued to peer skyward toward the unusual and potentially dangerous scene.

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