Skip to main content

Terry decides against appealing FA racism verdict

updated 9:12 AM EDT, Thu October 18, 2012
John Terry made 76 appearances for England over a nine-year period before retiring from international football.
John Terry made 76 appearances for England over a nine-year period before retiring from international football.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Chelsea's John Terry will not appeal against the FA's racial abuse verdict
  • Terry fined and given a four-match ban for abusing Queens Park Rangers' Anton Ferdinand
  • The defender apologizes for using the words "f*****g black c***"
  • The 31-year-old was cleared of any criminal wrongdoing by a magistrates' court in July

(CNN) -- Chelsea captain John Terry has opted not to appeal the English Football Association's verdict that he racially abused Queens Park Rangers defender Anton Ferdinand.

Former England captain Terry was fined $356,000 and banned for four matches after English soccer's rulemakers found him guilty earlier this month.

Terry apologized for the expletives he used during the match at QPR's Loftus Road stadium in October 2011, when he used the words "f*****g black c**".

"After careful consideration, I have decided not to appeal against the FA judgment," the 31-year-old said in a statement released by his management company.

Mourinho: John Terry is not a racist
Collymore on John Terry quitting
John Terry cleared of racial abuse
England captain charged with racism

"I want to take this opportunity to apologize to everyone for the language I used in the game against Queens Park Rangers last October.

"Although I'm disappointed with the FA judgment, I accept that the language I used, regardless of the context, is not acceptable on the football field or indeed in any walk of life."

Read: Racism row shines light on Serbian football

Terry was cleared of any criminal charges by a London magistrates' court in July, but the FA uses the "balance of probabilities" as its standard of proof as opposed to the "beyond reasonable doubt" used in English law.

An FA report detailing its reasons for sanctioning Terry described the central defender's defense as "improbable, implausible and contrived".

Read: Crime and punishment in sport

The affair has led to Terry ending his international career after winning 78 caps since making his debut in 2003.

"As I stated in the criminal case, with the benefit of hindsight my language was clearly not an appropriate reaction to the situation for someone in my position," continued the statement from Terry.

"My response was below the level expected by Chelsea football club, and by me, and it will not happen again.

"Looking forward, I will continue to do my part in assisting the club to remove all types of discriminatory behavior from football. I am extremely grateful for the consistent support of Chelsea, the fans and my family."

In a statement released on Thursday, Chelsea said additional in-house discplinary action had been taken against Terry but that "in accordance with our long-standing policy, that disciplinary action will remain confidential."

Chelsea also condemned the language used by Terry, saying: "The club firmly believes such language is not acceptable and fell below the standards expected of John as a Chelsea player."

The evidence given to the FA by Terry's Chelsea teammate Ashley Cole was also criticized in the report, leading to the left-back calling England's ruling body a "bunch of twats" on Twitter.

Cole has since apologized "unreservedly" and been fined £90,000 ($145,000) by the FA.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
CNN Football Club
Be part of CNN's coverage of European Champions League matches and join the social debate.
updated 11:23 AM EDT, Tue April 15, 2014
The 1989 Hillsborough stadium tragedy, which claimed 96 lives, brought the red and the blue halves of Liverpool together.
CNN's Don Riddell says the 1989 Hillsborough tragedy has caused irreparable damage to the families of the 96 victims and the survivors.
updated 8:44 AM EDT, Fri April 11, 2014
The Champions league trophy stands on show during the draw for the quarter-finals of the UEFA Champions league at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon on March 21, 2014. AFP PHOTO/FABRICE COFFRINI (Photo credit should read FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)
Two European heavyweights will collide in the Champions League semifinals after Bayern Munich and Real Madrid were drawn together in Switzerland.
updated 8:48 AM EDT, Mon March 24, 2014
West Bromwich Albion's French striker Nicolas Anelka looks on during the English Premier League football match between West Bromwich Albion and Newcastle United at The Hawthorns in West Bromwich, central England, on January 1, 2014.
England prides itself on being the home of football, but is the nation dysfunctional in dealing with racist abuse?
updated 9:39 AM EDT, Tue March 18, 2014
In a city where football is a religion, Liverpool and England striker Daniel Sturridge is fast becoming a deity.
French former football player Zinedine Zidane reacts during the gala football 'Match Against Poverty' organized by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) on March 4, 2014 in Bern.
Some of the biggest names in football lined up for a charity match, but CNN's Tom McGowan wonders if they can help beat poverty.
updated 10:55 AM EST, Tue March 4, 2014
"Everyone is scared about war -- they are very nervous," former Ukraine football star Oleg Luzhny says of the rising tensions with Russia.
updated 1:07 PM EST, Wed February 26, 2014
Bayern Munich's present success rests on one key decision, chairman Karl-Heinz Rummenigge tells CNN.
updated 4:22 AM EST, Tue February 18, 2014
Neymar
"More than a Club." It is an image Barcelona has carefully cultivated, but could the controversial deal to sign Neymar sour that view?
updated 1:25 PM EST, Sat February 1, 2014
Affectionately known as "the wise man of Hortaleza," Luis Aragones -- who died aged 75 -- left the legacy of helping Spain's ascension to the top.
updated 4:18 PM EST, Thu January 23, 2014
Real Madrid hasn't won the European Champions League in over a decade, but the Spanish club is invincible in one field -- making money.
The naming of the world's best footballer is not all that it seems, says CNN's James Masters.
ADVERTISEMENT