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Ryder Cup hero Lawrie: Hostile U.S. reception helped Europe

updated 5:44 AM EDT, Thu October 4, 2012
Paul Lawrie poses with the Ryder Cup in front of the Gleneagles Hotel in Scotland.
Paul Lawrie poses with the Ryder Cup in front of the Gleneagles Hotel in Scotland.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Paul Lawrie returns Ryder Cup to next host venue of Gleneagles
  • Scot speaks of hostile reception Europe players received at Medinah
  • Lawrie believes it made them determined to retain trophy
  • Martin Kaymer joins Lawrie at this week's Alfred Dunhill Links event

(CNN) -- Paul Lawrie returned the Ryder Cup to its next host venue of Gleneagles Wednesday then revealed how the hostile reception he and his Europe teammates received from the Medinah galleries had given them even greater resolve.

Scot Lawrie proved a last day hero after his 5&3 victory over Brandt Snedeker helped his team retain the trophy, but he did not enjoy being the butt of the American supporters.

"I didn't get abused, but you get 'top it, shank it, you're a loser', stuff like that, every shot you play," he said.

Europe's historic Ryder Cup comeback
Poulter is clutch with tough putts

It came as no surprise to the 43-year-old veteran, who played in the infamous "Battle of Brookline" in 1999 where raucous home support helped the Americans overturn a four-point deficit on the last day.

This time the boot was on the other foot, as inspired by team captain Jose Maria Olazabal, the Europeans silenced the crowd and pulled off the same feat in the concluding singles.

"It makes it all the more satisfying on Sunday night when you're standing there with the Ryder Cup in front of you and they are not. I think it helps us, to be fair.

"I think they (the United States team) said it's the same when they come here. Apparently that's how it is, but I can't see that."

Lawrie has returned to a heroes welcome on home soil where he will be playing in the Alfred Dunhill Links tournament this week.

I didn't get abused, but you get 'top it, shank it, you're a loser', stuff like that, every shot you play
Paul Lawrie

"Since I arrived here I can hardly get a ball hit for people coming up kind of slapping you on the back. It's been lovely," he added.

Germany's Martin Kaymer, who holed the testing final putt to make sure Europe retained the Ryder Cup as he beat Steve Stricker, is also in the field.

Kaymer had rolled his initial birdie putt on the 18th at Medinah about six foot past the hole to leave the Europe supporters with their hearts in their mouth.

"Even though it was more difficult in the end, it was an even better feeling. Of course it was a lot of pressure, but I see it more like a gift what happened," he told the official European Tour website.

"There will never, ever, be a more important putt in my life. Even if I have a chance in two years' time again (At Gleneagles) I've done it before already," added the 27-year-old.

Kaymer will be looking for his second win in three stagings of the tournament when play gets underway Thursday.

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