What should America's top foreign policy priority be? Survey says...

Story highlights

  • 45% on Facebook poll say post-Arab Spring policies should be top task
  • One in five believe euro debt crisis should be America's top priority
  • 18.5% think next commander-in-chief must focus first on China relations
  • UK, U.S. and Egypt are top three participating countries in Facebook survey

What's the first foreign policy issue the next U.S. president should tackle after the election?

More than 1,000 aspiring foreign secretaries in 114 countries and territories around the world weighed in on CNN International's latest Facebook survey to give us their answer.

Vote now on Facebook: What should be top U.S. foreign policy task?

The verdict: 45% of voters said America's post-Arab Spring policies should be the top foreign policy priority for either Barack Obama or Mitt Romney.

This mirrors the week's biggest story -- violent protests in Egypt and Libya that resulted in the storming of U.S. diplomatic buildings following the publication on YouTube of an amateur film portraying the Prophet Mohammed in a negative light.

More: Facebook CNN Election Insights tool

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The attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi on Tuesday led to the death of U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens, and by Friday the protests had spread to at least eight other countries.

Our Facebook survey also reflects lingering worries about the European debt crisis: 21% of respondents said America's top task should be to address the crisis that threatens to undermine the euro.

Nearly one in five (18.5%) believe sorting out relations with China should be the next president's first order of business. But just one in 10 people see Iranian and North Korean nuclear proliferation as the top priority.

More: Latest updates at CNN's Election Center

And last but not least, just one in 20 people (4.7%) chose fighting al Qaeda as the number one foreign policy for the U.S. president -- despite the fact al Qaeda militants and associates are now fighting for influence from Mali to Pakistan.

Last week's Facebook survey (insert link) was dominated by men (75%), and this week even more so: four out of five (80%) who cast votes in our foreign policy survey were male.

The British cast more than a quarter (27%) of this week's votes, followed by the U.S. (17%), Egypt and the Philippines.

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And, much like last week, the vast majority (62%)of voters were aged 18 to 34. Thanks to everyone who took part.

Did you vote in this week's Facebook survey? If not, what would you like to vote on next week? Leave us top tips in the comments below.

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