A young Democrat's buzz-worthy moments from the DNC

Schlossberg: Lilly Ledbetter "framed fair pay as both an economic and moral issue" on night one of the DNC.

Story highlights

  • Democratic Party showed it's commitment to women's equality through host of speakers
  • Lilly Ledbetter "framed fair pay as both an economic and moral issue"
  • "Equal pay for equal work should not be a controversial issue in the 21st century"
  • Michelle Obama didn't need to shout, "I love you, women" to be heard by women in America
Tuesday night, the Democratic Party displayed its deep commitment to women's equality.
Drawing upon her own life story, a story of discrimination shared by too many women across America, Lilly Ledbetter delivered a rousing speech as only she can. Ledbetter, the face of the fight for women's equality, reminded us all just how far we have come in the last four years. She framed fair pay as both an economic and moral issue.
She reminded us all of President Barack Obama's first act in office, the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, which he signed thinking of his mother, wife and two young daughters. Ledbetter, a former manager at a tire plant, knows that her family was deprived of thousands of dollars because of discrimination, money that could have been put back into the U.S. economy.
As my mother's son and the brother to two older and wiser sisters, this issue resonates particularly deeply with me.
Equal pay for equal work should not be a controversial issue in the 21st Century, but like the debate over contraception and choice, somehow the Republican Party has reignited a debate that should have ended decades ago.
Just to be clear, my sisters would scoff if my work was ever called equal to theirs.
In addition, first lady Michelle Obama reminded Americans that her most important title is still "Mom in Chief." She identified herself as yet another mother struggling with the difficulties of parenting who cares more than anything about the country that she will leave to her children.
Michelle Obama did not need to shout, "I love you, women" in order to be understood by the women of America; her story is their story.
While women will surely play a crucial role in this election, Tuesday night served as a reminder that Obama's commitment to women is not political -- it's personal. America will never succeed if half of its citizens don't have an ally in the White House.