By the numbers: the DNC and its host city, Charlotte

Story highlights

  • 751,087: Population of Charlotte, North Carolina
  • 35,000: Number of attendees expected at the Democratic National Convention
  • $150 million to $200 million: Expected economic impact on North Carolina
  • 70: Expected number of protest groups during the convention

Charlotte, North Carolina, also known as the "Queen City," is expected to reap the economic benefits for hosting the Democratic National Convention.

But how much?

Here's a look - by the numbers.

751,087: Population of Charlotte, North Carolina.

35,000: Number of attendees expected at the Democratic National Convention.

15,000: Number of attendees from the media.

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6,000: Number of expected delegates.

13,950: Number of hotel rooms booked in the Charlotte metropolitan area by convention attendees.

88.5%: Percentage of hotel rooms in the Charlotte area booked for the convention.

$36 million: Amount Charlotte host committee is expected to spend on the DNC.

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$128.7 million: Expected economic impact on North Carolina from the Democratic National Convention, according to Jones Lang LaSalle. This takes into account losses of $6.6 million from Charlotte-area residents avoiding downtown during the event.

$150 million to $200 million: Expected economic impact on North Carolina, according to the state Department of Commerce.

$127.3 million: Total economic impact realized by Denver after the 2008 Democratic National Convention.

$8.6 million: Amount of money lost by Boston from hosting the 2004 Democratic National Convention.

$12 million: Amount spent by the Democratic National Convention Committee to remodel Time Warner Cable Arena and Bank of America stadium.

70: Expected number of protest groups that will take part in demonstrations during the convention.

$50 million: Amount of federal funds allocated to Charlotte for police and security.

1,685: Number of police officers on the force in Charlotte.

      Election 2012

    • CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 06:  U.S. President Barack Obama stands on stage with first lady Michelle Obama, U.S. Vice President Joe Biden and Dr. Jill Biden after his victory speech on election night at McCormick Place November 6, 2012 in Chicago, Illinois. Obama won reelection against Republican candidate, former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

      A black man is returning to the White House. Four years ago, it was a first, the breaking of a racial barrier. Tuesday night, it was history redux. And more.
    • CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 06:  U.S. President Barack Obama stands on stage after his victory speech at McCormick Place November 6, 2012 in Chicago, Illinois. Obama won reelection against Republican candidate, former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

      The 2012 presidential election shattered spending records, further polarized a divided country and launched a thousand hashtags.
    • Even though voters indicated to pollsters that their financial situation is the same or worse than it was four years ago, they put their trust in the president.
    • US President Barack Obama addresses a crowd of supporters on stage on election night November 6, 2012 in Chicago, Illinois. President Barack Obama swept to re-election Tuesday, forging history again by transcending a slow economic recovery and the high unemployment which haunted his first term to beat Republican Mitt Romney. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad        (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

      The president faces a long and familiar set of challenges after riding a wave of support from moderates, women and minorities to victory.
    • Republicans kept a lock on the U.S. House of Representatives, a crucial victory after the party failed to wrest away the presidency from Barack Obama and the Senate from the Democrats.