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South Korea's Park Inbee triumphs at Evian Masters; Wiesberger's home win

updated 2:03 PM EDT, Sun July 29, 2012
Park Inbee clutches the winning trophy at the Evian Masters after the South Korean's two-shot victory.
Park Inbee clutches the winning trophy at the Evian Masters after the South Korean's two-shot victory.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • South Korea's Park Inbee wins Evian Masters
  • Park finishes two shots clear of longtime leader Stacy Lewis and Karrie Webb
  • Top prize of $431,000 is the biggest in women's golf
  • Bernd Wiesberger wins European Tour's Austrian Open on home soil

(CNN) -- South Korea's Park Inbee captured the most lucrative prize in women's golf as a closing 66 saw her win the Evian Masters Sunday.

Park picked up a check for $431,000 for her two-shot victory in the joint LPGA and Ladies European Tour event in France.

She took advantage of holing a string of birdie putts to total 17-under 271 with long time leader Stacy Lewis of the United States and Australian Karrie Webb tied for second.

Lewis, who had led from the first day, finished with a flourish with a birdie on the 18th for a 68 while Webb birdied the final two holes in her 67.

This is so exciting. Today I was red hot with the putter
Park Inbee

Park was winning for only the second time as a professional, adding to her victory as a 19-year-old at the U.S. Open.

"This is so exciting," she said. "Today I was red hot with the putter."

China's Feng Shanshan, who shot a 66, South Korean amateur Kim Hyo Joo (68), and the 2007 champion Natalie Gulbis (68) of the United States tied for fourth place on 14 under par.

Meanwhile on the men's European Tour, Bernd Wiesberger cheered home fans as a seven-under 65 gave him victory in the Austrian Open in Vienna Sunday.

The 26-year-old overtook overnight leader Thorbjørn Olesen of Denmark and Frenchman Thomas Levet with four birdies in five holes around the turn at the Diamond Country Club.

It was Wiesberger's second win on the Tour this season after his victory at the Ballantine's Championship.

"It's the best day of my life so far," he told the official European Tour website.

"It seems like it went my way, especially the last two holes. I had such a great country and such great fans backing me."

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